Timeline of Cloudflare

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This is a timeline of Cloudflare, an American web infrastructure and website security company.

Big picture

Time period Development summary
2011 Cloudflare reaches 100 billion page views.[1]
2015 Cloudflare launches DNS, Web Security, and Web Performance.[1] The company raises US$110 million from investors.[2]
2016 Cloudflare launches Secure Registrar, Rate Limiting, and Load Balancing.[1]
2017 Cloudflare launches unmettered DDoS mitigation, IoT security, video services, and intelligent routing.[1]
2018 Cloudflare reaches 67,900 customers generating US$193 million in revenue. The company launches multi-protocol network performance and security, zero trust security, DNS resolver, and serverless platform.[1]
2019 Cloudflare launches distributed storage, layer 3/4 DDos mitigation, bot mitigation, and announces virtual private network.[1]

Full timeline

Year Month and date Event type Details
2009 July Cloudflare is founded by Matthew Prince, Lee Holloway, and Michelle Zatlyn.[3][4][5]
2009 November Financial Cloudflare raises $2.1 million in a Series A round from Pelion Venture Partners and Venrock."[6]
2010 September Service launch Cloudflare is launched at the September 2010 TechCrunch Disrupt conference.[3][4]
2011 June Controversy Cloudflare receives media attention for providing security services to the website of LulzSec, a black hat hacking group.[3][7]
2011 July Financial Cloudflare raises US$20 million in a Series B round from New Enterprise Associates, Pelion Venture Partners, Venrock.[6][8][9]
2011 October Recognition The Wall Street Journal names Cloudflare the "Most Innovative Network & Internet Technology Company".[10][11]
2012 June Partnership Cloudflare partners with various web hosts, including HostPapa, to implement its "Railgun" technology: a web protocol intended to improve performance.[12][13]
2012 December Financial Cloudflare raises US$50 million in a Series C round from New Enterprise Associates, Pelion Venture Partners, Venrock, Union Square Ventures, and Greenspring Associates.[14][15]
2012 October Recognition The Wall Street Journal names Cloudflare for a second time as the "Most Innovative Network & Internet Technology Company".[10][11]
2012 Recognition Cloudflare is recognized by the World Economic Forum as a Technology Pioneer.[16]
2012 Recognition Fast Company ranks Cloudflare among the world's 10 most innovative companies.[17]
2013 March Cloudflare defends The Spamhaus Project from a DDoS attack that exceeds 300 Gbit/s. Akamai's chief architect states that at the time it is "the largest publicly announced DDoS attack in the history of the Internet".[18][19]
2014 February Security Cloudflare mitigates the largest ever recorded DDoS attack, which peaks at 400 Gigabits per second against an undisclosed customer.[20]
2014 February 24 Acquisition Cloudflare acquires StopTheHacker, which offers malware detection, automatic malware removal, and reputation and blacklist monitoring.[21][22]
2014 June 18 Acquisition Cloudflare acquires CryptoSeal, which provides Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) as a service.[22]
2014 November Cloudflare reportes another massive DDoS attack with independent media sites being targeted at 500 Gbit/s.[23]
2014 Program launch Cloudflare introduces an effort called Project Galileo in response to cyberattacks against vulnerable online targets, such as artists, activists, journalists, and human rights groups. Project Galileo provides such groups with free services to protect their websites.[24][24]
2014 December Financial Cloudflare raises US$110 million in a Series D round led by Fidelity Investments, with participation from CapitalG, Microsoft, Qualcomm, and Baidu.[25]
2015 February Recognition Cloudflare is named "Best Enterprise Startup" by TechCrunch at the 8th Annual Crunchies Awards.[26]
2015 March 10 Product Cloudflare announces Virtual DNS, which provides DDoS mitigation and global distribution to DNS nameservers.[27]
2015 October A report finds that Cloudflare provisioned 40% of SSL certificates used by phishing sites with deceptive domain names resembling those of banks and payment processors.[28]
2015 November Controversy hacktivist group Anonymous discourages the use of Cloudflare's services following the ISIL attacks in Paris and the renewed accusation that Cloudflare aids terrorists.[29]
2016 February 22 Product CloudFlare announces launch of its own domain name registrar service focused on security.[30][31][32]
2016 September A major Cloudflare bug (nicknamed Cloudbleed) starts leaking sensitive data, including passwords and authentication tokens, from customer websites by sending extra data in response to web requests.[33] The leaks result from a buffer overflow which occurred, according to analysis by Cloudflare, on approximately 1 in every 3,300,000 HTTP requests.[34][35]
2016 September 16 Recognition Forbes Cloud 100 ranks Cloudflare 11th on its list of top 100 cloud companies.[36][37][38]
2016 September 29 Product Cloudflare launches its Rate Limiting, which allows customers to rate limit, shape or block traffic based on the number of requests per second per IP, cookie, or authentication token.[39]
2016 December 13 Acquisition Cloudflare acquires Eager, which provides a free platform enabling non-technical website owners to install client-side plugins to improve their websites.[40][22]
2017 January Userbase As of date Cloudflare provides DNS services to 12 million websites.[41] adding approximately 20,000 new customers every day.[42]
2017 August 6 Breaking with its long-standing policy of total content neutrality, Cloudflare ceases providing services to the neo-Nazi, white supremacist, and Holocaust denial commentary and message board website The Daily Stormer on August 16, 2017, in the aftermath of the fatal vehicular attack at the Charlottesville rally four days earlier. This dropps the website's protection against DDoS attacks, and soon thereafter attackers take down the website.[43]
2017 November 14 Acquisition Cloudflare acquires Neumob, a mobile VPN startup.[44][22]
2018 April 1 Product Cloudflare announces a 'privacy-first' consumer DNS service, hosted at IP addresses 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1. Alternatively, the service can be accessed via IPv6 at 2606:4700:4700::1111 and 2606:4700:4700::1001.[45][46]
2018 November 1 Product Cloudflare announces a mobile version of their 1.1.1.1 service for iOS and Android.[47]
2019 March Financial Cloudflare raises US$150 million in a Series E round, led by Franklin Templeton Investments, with participation from New Enterprise Associates, Union Square Ventures, Venrock, Pelion Venture Partners, Greenspring Associates, CapitalG, Microsoft, Baidu, Qualcomm and Fidelity.[48]
2019 April 1 Product Cloudflare announces a new freemium Virtual Private Network service named Warp. The service would initially be available through the 1.1.1.1 mobile apps with a desktop app available later.[49]
2019 June 21 Cloudflare announces that users would be able to sync their computer's time securely with Cloudflare's Network Time Protocol (NTP) service. Cloudflare's time service would allow users to connect to their NTP server that supports Network Time Security (NTS), enabling users to obtain time in an authenticated manner.[50]
2019 July Cloudflare suffers a major outage, which renders more than 12 million websites (80% of all customers) unreachable for 27 minutes.[51]
2019 August 15 Cloudflare submits its S-1 filing for IPO on the New York Stock Exchange under the stock ticker NET.[52]
2019 August Cloudflare terminates services to 8chan, an American imageboard, after the perpetrator of the 2019 El Paso shootings allegedly used the website to upload his manifesto.[53][54]
2019 August As of date, Cloudflare has around 1,069 employees.[1]
2019 September 11 Recognition Forbes Cloud 100 ranks Cloudflare 11th on its list of top 100 cloud companies.[55]
2019 Product Cloudflare announces a new domain registrar service that promises to offer low-cost wholesale pricing and easy ways to enable DNSSEC.

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See also

External links

References

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  42. Template:Cite interview
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