Difference between revisions of "Timeline of Cochrane"

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| 1993 || || || "Cochrane, previously known as the Cochrane Collaboration, was founded in 1993 under the leadership of {{w|Iain Chalmers}}."<ref>{{Cite journal|last=Ault|first=Alicia|date=2003-06-27|title=Clinical research. Climbing a medical Everest|journal=Science|volume=300|issue=5628|pages=2024–2025|doi=10.1126/science.300.5628.2024|pmid=12829761}}</ref>
 
| 1993 || || || "Cochrane, previously known as the Cochrane Collaboration, was founded in 1993 under the leadership of {{w|Iain Chalmers}}."<ref>{{Cite journal|last=Ault|first=Alicia|date=2003-06-27|title=Clinical research. Climbing a medical Everest|journal=Science|volume=300|issue=5628|pages=2024–2025|doi=10.1126/science.300.5628.2024|pmid=12829761}}</ref>
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| 1994 || || || Cochrane Schizophrenia Group is registered with the Cochrane Collaboration Schizophrenia Review Group, and starts collecting relevant randomized control trials and producing and disseminating these within the Cochrane Library.<ref>{{cite web |last1=ADAMS |first1=CLIVE E. |title=Schizophrenia trials: past, present and future |url=https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/10fc/d14c1e37318ab0bdd11b9e7ebb3289b6eed8.pdf |website=pdfs.semanticscholar.org}}</ref>
 
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| 1997 || || || Cochrane South Africa is established.<ref>{{cite journal |last1=Abdulwadud |first1=Omar |last2=Nigatu |first2=Balkachew |last3=Azazh |first3=Aklilu |last4=Mekasha |first4=Amha |last5=Heye |first5=Tigist Bacha |last6=Debebeb |first6=Finote |last7=Geremew Emirub |first7=Haimanot |title=Cochrane, evidence-based medicine and associated factors: A cross-sectional study of the experiences and knowledge of Ethiopian specialists in training |doi=10.1016/j.afjem.2019.01.005 |url=https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211419X1830096X}}</ref>  
 
| 1997 || || || Cochrane South Africa is established.<ref>{{cite journal |last1=Abdulwadud |first1=Omar |last2=Nigatu |first2=Balkachew |last3=Azazh |first3=Aklilu |last4=Mekasha |first4=Amha |last5=Heye |first5=Tigist Bacha |last6=Debebeb |first6=Finote |last7=Geremew Emirub |first7=Haimanot |title=Cochrane, evidence-based medicine and associated factors: A cross-sectional study of the experiences and knowledge of Ethiopian specialists in training |doi=10.1016/j.afjem.2019.01.005 |url=https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211419X1830096X}}</ref>  

Latest revision as of 12:10, 15 November 2019

This is a timeline of Cochrane, a non-profit organization aimed at providing up-to-date, accurate information about the effects of healthcare available worldwide.[1]


Big picture

Time period Development summary More details

Full timeline

Year Month and date Event type Details
1992 " Funds were provided by the UK’s National Health Service Research and Development Programme to establish the first 'Cochrane Centre', which opened in Oxford in 1992, which collaborated with others in the UK and elsewhere, and facilitated systematic reviews across all areas of medicine."[1]
1992 "In 1992, Chalmers was appointed director of the UK Cochrane Centre,[2] leading to the development of the international Cochrane Collaboration."[3][4]
1993 "Cochrane, previously known as the Cochrane Collaboration, was founded in 1993 under the leadership of Iain Chalmers."[5]
1994 Cochrane Schizophrenia Group is registered with the Cochrane Collaboration Schizophrenia Review Group, and starts collecting relevant randomized control trials and producing and disseminating these within the Cochrane Library.[6]
1997 Cochrane South Africa is established.[7]
1998 "In 1998, the Cochrane Economics Methods Group (CEMG) was established to facilitate the basing of decisions on health economics, evidence-based medicine and systematic reviews."[8]
2004 "In 2004, the Campbell Collaboration joined with the CEMG to form the Campbell & Cochrane Economics Methods Group (CCEMG)."[9][10]
2013 "In 2013 the organization published an editorial describing its efforts to train people in developing nations to perform Cochrane reviews."[11]
2016 "Data published on the Cochrane website suggest that in 2016 there are more than 37,000 contributors from over 130 countries, many of whom are authors of Cochrane Reviews."[1]
2017 "A 2017 editorial briefly discussed the history of Cochrane methodological approaches, such as including studies that use methodologies in lieu of randomised control trials and the challenge of having evidence adopted in practice."[12]
2018 "During its 2018 annual meeting, the Cochrane board expelled Peter Gøtzsche, board member and director of Cochrane's Nordic center, from the organization, telling Nature that it had received "numerous complaints" about Gøtzsche after he co-authored an article in BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine alleging bias in Cochrane's May 2018"[13]

Meta information on the timeline

How the timeline was built

The initial version of the timeline was written by FIXME.

Funding information for this timeline is available.

Feedback and comments

Feedback for the timeline can be provided at the following places:

  • FIXME

What the timeline is still missing

Timeline update strategy

See also

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 "The Cochrane collaboration". healthknowledge.org.uk. Retrieved 21 September 2019. 
  2. The Cochrane Collaboration Template:Webarchive
  3. Starr, Mark; Chalmers, Iain; Clarke, Mike; Oxman, Andrew D (2009). "The origins, evolution, and future of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews". International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care. 25: 182–195. PMID 19534840. doi:10.1017/s026646230909062x. 
  4. Fox, Daniel M (2011). "Systematic Reviews and Health Policy: The Influence of a Project on Perinatal Care since 1988". Milbank Quarterly. 89 (3): 425–449. PMC 3214717Freely accessible. PMID 21933275. doi:10.1111/j.1468-0009.2011.00635.x. 
  5. Ault, Alicia (2003-06-27). "Clinical research. Climbing a medical Everest". Science. 300 (5628): 2024–2025. PMID 12829761. doi:10.1126/science.300.5628.2024. 
  6. ADAMS, CLIVE E. "Schizophrenia trials: past, present and future" (PDF). pdfs.semanticscholar.org. 
  7. Abdulwadud, Omar; Nigatu, Balkachew; Azazh, Aklilu; Mekasha, Amha; Heye, Tigist Bacha; Debebeb, Finote; Geremew Emirub, Haimanot. "Cochrane, evidence-based medicine and associated factors: A cross-sectional study of the experiences and knowledge of Ethiopian specialists in training". doi:10.1016/j.afjem.2019.01.005. 
  8. http://file.zums.ac.ir/ebook/085-Evidence-Based%20Health%20Economics%20(Evidence-Based%20Medicine)-Miranda%20Mugford%20Luke%20Vale%20Cam%20Donal.pdf
  9. Shemilt, I; Mugford, M; Drummond, M; Eisenstein, E; Mallender, J; McDaid, D; Vale, L; Walker, D; The Campbell & Cochrane Economics Methods Group (CCEMG) (2006). "Economics methods in Cochrane systematic reviews of health promotion and public health related interventions". BMC Medical Research Methodology. 6: 55. PMC 1660547Freely accessible. PMID 17107612. doi:10.1186/1471-2288-6-55. 
  10. "Welcome". 
  11. Young T, Garner P, Kredo T, Mbuagbaw L, Tharyan P, Volmink J (2013). "Cochrane and capacity building in low- and middle-income countries: where are we at? [editorial]". Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 11 (11): ED000072. PMID 24524153. doi:10.1002/14651858.ED000072. 
  12. Ruotsalainen, Jani; Sauni, Riitta; Verbeek, Jos (2017). "Cochrane Work—championing facts since 2003". Occupational Medicine. 67 (7): 504–506. PMID 29048596. doi:10.1093/occmed/kqx073. 
  13. Jørgensen, Lars; Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Jefferson, Tom (2018). "The Cochrane HPV vaccine review was incomplete and ignored important evidence of bias". BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine. 23 (5): 165–168. PMID 30054374 Check |pmid= value (help). doi:10.1136/bmjebm-2018-111012.