Difference between revisions of "Timeline of Helen Keller International"

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This is a '''timeline of {{w|Helen Keller International}}''', one of the oldest international nonprofit organizations devoted to preventing blindness and reducing malnutrition worldwide."<ref name="HKI">{{cite web |title=Helen Keller International (HKI) |url=https://www.devex.com/organizations/helen-keller-international-hki-24491 |website=devex.com |accessdate=4 September 2019}}</ref>
+
This is a '''timeline of {{w|Helen Keller International}}''', one of the oldest international nonprofit organizations devoted to preventing blindness and reducing malnutrition worldwide.<ref name="HKI">{{cite web |title=Helen Keller International (HKI) |url=https://www.devex.com/organizations/helen-keller-international-hki-24491 |website=devex.com |accessdate=4 September 2019}}</ref>
 
   
 
   
  
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{| class="wikitable"
 
{| class="wikitable"
! Time period !! Development summary   
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! Time period !! Development summary !! More details  
 
|-
 
|-
| 1920s || "In the 1920s the organization began serving blind civilians, as well as military personnel, and also began printing texts in Braille, a writing system for the blind that uses raised dots."<ref name="Helen Keller International">{{cite web |title=Helen Keller International |url=https://www.britannica.com/topic/Helen-Keller-International |website=britannica.com |accessdate=4 September 2019}}</ref> "In the late 1960s the focus again broadened, this time toward blindness prevention and treatment, including efforts to reduce malnutrition in children. One successful effort was the distribution of vitamin A to millions of children in developing countries. This campaign drastically reduced the number of cases of childhood blindness. "<ref name="Helen Keller International"/>
+
| 1880–1968 || Helen Keller lifetime || In her early months, {{w|Helen Keller}} from {{w|Tuscumbia, Alabama}}, becomes blind and deaf due to an illness. Instructed by {{w|Anne Sullivan}}, she would be the first deaf-blind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. This and other achievements lead Helen Keller to become the most famous disabled person in the world. Throughout her life, she would succeed as an author, political activist, and lecturer.
 
|-
 
|-
| Present time || "Spanning 22 countries around the world, their entire organization, including their worldwide staff, their Board of Trustees, and their Senior Management Team work tirelessly towards this goal. One of their founding trustees is the great deaf-blind crusader, Helen Keller, and theyw are proud to carry on in her name and memory"<ref name="HKI"/>
+
| 1915–1925 || Early organization development || In 1915, George and his wife Cora Parsons Kessler organize the British, French, and Belgian Permanent Blind Relief War Fund in Europe. In 1919, with support from Helen Keller, the Kesslers incorporate the Permanent Blind Relief War Fund for Soldiers & Sailors of the Allies in the United States.<ref name="Our Historyv">{{cite web |title=Our History |url=https://www.hki.org/our-impact/about-us/our-history#.XciLNlX0mUk |website=hki.org |accessdate=10 November 2019}}</ref> In the 1920s the organization begins serving blind civilians, as well as military personnel, and also begins printing texts in {{w|Braille}}.<ref name="Helen Keller International">{{cite web |title=Helen Keller International |url=https://www.britannica.com/topic/Helen-Keller-International |website=britannica.com |accessdate=4 September 2019}}</ref>
 +
|-
 +
| 1925–1946 || American Braille Press for War and Civilian Blind || The Permanent Blind Relief War Fund expands its focus beyond a purely war relief effort to one of aid and comfort to the civilian blind worldwide. The organization changes its name to the American Braille Press for War and Civilian Blind.<ref name="Our Historyv"/>
 +
|-
 +
| 1946–1977 || American Foundation for the Overseas Blind || After {{w|World War II}}, the Press affiliates with the {{w|American Foundation for the Blind}}. To reflect that close association, it changes its name to the American Foundation for the Overseas Blind (AFOB) and starts expanding its mission to include rehabilitation. In 1946, {{w|Helen Keller}} makes the first of many trips under the auspices of the Foundation to investigate the conditions and needs of blind people worldwide.<ref name="Our Historyv"/> In the 1950s, the organization evolves from treating blind people to working to prevent blindness.<ref>{{cite web |title=Helen Keller International Wins BBVA Award |url=https://www.hki.org/updates/helen-keller-international-wins-bbva-award#.XbsoJ5L0mUk |website=hki.org |accessdate=31 October 2019}}</ref> In the late 1960s the focus again broadens, this time toward blindness prevention and treatment.<ref name="Helen Keller International"/> The Spirit of Helen Keller Award is established in 1959.
 +
|-
 +
| 1977 onwards || Helen Keller International || In order to recognize the contributions of {{w|Helen Keller}}, AFOB adopts the name of Helen Keller International.<ref name="Our Historyv"/> In the 1970s, HKI pioneers {{w|Vitamin A}} supplementation, which is successfully distributed to millions of children in developing countries, drastically reducing the number of cases of childhood blindness.<ref>{{cite web |title=HKI Named a Top Charity by GiveWell |url=https://www.hki.org/updates/hki-named-top-charity-givewell-0#.XbsnYJL0mUk |website=hki.org |accessdate=31 October 2019}}</ref><ref name="Helen Keller International"/> In the 1970s, HKI conducts operations in Asia including {{w|Philippines}} and {{w|Bangladesh}}. In the 1980s HKI starts operations in several countries in Africa. Also in this decade, the organization develops a homestead gardening (HG) program to increase fruits and vegetables consumption after a blindness survey reveals that households with gardens are less likely to have children with night blindness.<ref>{{cite journal |last1=Hirvonen |first1=Kalle |last2=Headey |first2=Derek |title=Can governments promote homestead gardening at scale? Evidence from Ethiopia |doi=10.1016/j.gfs.2018.09.001 |url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6333280/ |accessdate=30 October 2019}}</ref> In the 1990s and 2000s, HKI keeps expanding its operations into new countries. The Helen Keller Visionary Award is established in 2005. The Helen Keller Humanitarian Award is established in 2007. In the 2010s, over 200 million {{w|vitamin A}} capsules are provided by HKI to children in {{w|Africa}}. As of 2019, the organization spans 22 countries around the world.<ref name="HKI"/> Today it is widely praised for its Vitamin A supplementation program, and is regarded as a top charity by evaluators.
 
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{| class="sortable wikitable"
 
{| class="sortable wikitable"
! Year !! Event type !! Details
+
! Year !! Event type !! Details !! Location
 
|-
 
|-
| 1880 || Helen Keller biography || {{w|Helen Keller}} is born.
+
| 1880 || Helen Keller biography || {{w|Helen Keller}} is born on June 27 in {{w|Tuscumbia, Alabama}}.<ref name="Helen Kellerbio">{{cite web |title=Helen Keller |url=https://www.britannica.com/biography/Helen-Keller |website=britannica.com |accessdate=17 October 2019}}</ref> || {{w|United States}}
 
|-  
 
|-  
| 1915 || || American merchant and {{w|RMS Lusitania}} survivor George Kessler and his wife, Cora Parsons Kessler, organize in {{w|Paris}} the British, French, and Belgian Permanent Relief War Fund. As a survivor, and vowing to help veterans in some way, George Kessler eventually settles on helping those blinded in the war. He then recruits author and lecturer {{w|Helen Keller}}.<ref name="Helen Keller International"/><ref name="HKI"/>
+
| 1882 || Helen Keller biography || At the age of 19 months, {{w|Helen Keller}} is afflicted with an illness (possibly {{w|scarlet fever}}) that leaves her blind and deaf.<ref name="Helen Kellerbio"/> || {{w|United States}}
 +
|-
 +
| 1887 (March) || Helen Keller biography || {{w|Anne Sullivan}} begins working with {{w|Helen Keller}} at the Keller's house.<ref>{{cite web |title=Helen Keller |url=https://www.teachingvisuallyimpaired.com/helen-keller.html |website=teachingvisuallyimpaired.com |accessdate=30 October 2019}}</ref> || {{w|United States}}
 +
|-
 +
| 1903 || Helen Keller biography || {{w|Helen Keller}} publishes her first book, an autobiography called ''The Story of My Life''.<ref name="Helen Keller's Life and Legacy"/> || {{w|United States}}
 +
|-
 +
| 1904 || Helen Keller biography || {{w|Helen Keller}} graduates cum laude from {{w|Radcliffe College}}, becoming the first deafblind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree.<ref name="Helen Keller's Life and Legacy"/> || {{w|United States}}
 +
|-
 +
| 1913 || Helen Keller biography || {{w|Helen Keller}} begins lecturing (with the aid of an interpreter), primarily on behalf of the American Foundation for the Blind.<ref name="Helen Kellerbio"/> || {{w|United States}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 1919 || || George Kessler, Cora Parsons Kessler, and {{w|Helen Keller}} form an American branch of the Permanent Relief War Fund called the Permanent Blind Relief War Fund for Soldiers and Sailors of the Allies, which is incorporated in {{w|New York City}}, with Keller and Cora Parsons Kessler as trustees.<ref name="Helen Keller International"/>
+
| 1915 || Early organization || American merchant and {{w|RMS Lusitania}} survivor George Kessler and his wife, Cora Parsons Kessler, organize in {{w|Paris}} the British, French, and Belgian Permanent Relief War Fund. As a survivor, and vowing to help veterans in some way, George Kessler eventually settles on helping those blinded in the war. He then recruits author and lecturer {{w|Helen Keller}}.<ref name="Helen Keller International"/><ref name="HKI"/> || {{w|France}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 1920 || || George Kessler dies and is succeeded by New York lawyer William Nelson Cromwell, co-founder of Sullivan & Cromwell, an international law firm headquartered in {{w|New York City}}.<ref name="Our History"/>
+
| 1919 || Early organization || George Kessler, Cora Parsons Kessler, and {{w|Helen Keller}} form an American branch of the Permanent Relief War Fund called the Permanent Blind Relief War Fund for Soldiers and Sailors of the Allies, which is incorporated in {{w|New York City}}, with Keller and Cora Parsons Kessler as trustees.<ref name="Helen Keller International"/> || {{w|United States}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 1925 || || The Permanent Relief War Fund begins serving blind civilians, as well as military personnel, and also begins printing texts in {{w|Braille}}, a writing system for the blind that uses raised dots. This prompts the name change to the American Braille Press for War and Civilian Blind.<ref name="Helen Keller International"/><ref name="Our History"/>
+
| 1920 || Early organization || {{w|Helen Keller}} cofounds the {{w|American Civil Liberties Union}} with American civil rights activist {{w|Roger Nash Baldwin}} and others.<ref name="Helen Kellerbio"/> || {{w|United States}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 1937 || || The American Braille Press for War and Civilian Blind publishes the first “talking book”, becoming one of the leading publishers of Braille texts.<ref name="Helen Keller International"/><ref name="Our History"/>
+
| 1920 || Leadership || George Kessler dies and is succeeded by New York lawyer William Nelson Cromwell, co-founder of Sullivan & Cromwell, an international law firm headquartered in {{w|New York City}}.<ref name="Our History"/> || {{w|United States}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 1937 || || The American Braille Press for War and Civilian Blind makes plans to aid soldiers who would inevitably be blinded in {{w|World War II}}.<ref name="Our History"/>
+
| 1924 || Helen Keller biography || {{w|Helen Keller}} joins the American Foundation for the Blind. She would serve as a spokesperson and ambassador for the foundation until her death.<ref name="Helen Keller's Life and Legacy"/> || {{w|United States}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 1939 || || {{w|World War II}} begins in {{w|Europe}}.<ref name="Our History"/>
+
| 1925 || Assistance || The Permanent Relief War Fund begins serving blind civilians, as well as military personnel, and also begins printing texts in {{w|Braille}}, a writing system for the blind that uses raised dots. This prompts the name change to the American Braille Press for War and Civilian Blind.<ref name="Helen Keller International"/><ref name="Our History"/> || {{w|United States}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 1946 || || The American Braille Press for War and Civilian Blind canges its name to the American Foundation for the Overseas Blind, as its mission expands to include rehabilitation of the blind.<ref name="Helen Keller International"/>
+
| 1937 || Publication || The American Braille Press for War and Civilian Blind publishes the first “talking book”, becoming one of the leading publishers of Braille texts.<ref name="Helen Keller International"/><ref name="Our History"/> || {{w|United States}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 1946 || || {{w|Helen Keller}} makes the first of many trips under the auspices of the Foundation to investigate the conditions and needs of blind people in all parts of the world.<ref name="Our History"/>
+
| 1937 || Program launch || The American Braille Press for War and Civilian Blind makes plans to aid soldiers who would inevitably be blinded in {{w|World War II}}.<ref name="Our History"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 1949 || || Spearheaded by the {{w|American Foundation for the Overseas Blind}}, an International Conference of Workers for the Blind, attended by representatives of the {{w|United Nations}} and {{w|UNESCO}} is held. Resolutions are passed, stressing the need to give blind people the physical, psychological and technical means to take their place in society, with a particular emphasis on education.<ref name="Our History"/>
+
| 1939 || Background || {{w|World War II}} begins in {{w|Europe}}.<ref name="Our History"/> || {{w|Europe}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 1959 || || The American Foundation for the Overseas Blind initiates the Helen Keller Crusade for the Blind, named to honor the leadership and inspiration she has given for many years. The purpose of the Crusade is to expand public awareness of and support of the Foundation’s programs.<ref name="Our History"/>
+
| 1946 || Helen Keller biography || On behalf of the American Foundation for Overseas Blind, {{w|Helen Keller}} begins touring internationally, expanding her advocacy for people with vision impairment. In 11 years, she would visit 35 countries on five continents.<ref name="Helen Keller's Life and Legacy"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 1959 || || "The Spirit of Helen Keller Award was established in 1959, during Helen Keller’s lifetime. The award commemorates her unique legacy and expresses appreciation for her role as a founder, trustee and staff member of Helen Keller International. First awardee was Colonel Edward A. Baker, one of the chief organizers of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, as the first recipient. "<ref name="Our History"/>
+
| 1946 || Renaming || The American Braille Press for War and Civilian Blind changes its name to the American Foundation for the Overseas Blind, as its mission expands to include rehabilitation of the blind.<ref name="Helen Keller International"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 1960 || Recognition by HKI || [[w:Edwin Baker (CNIB)Edwin Baker|Edwin Baker]], founder of the {{w|Canadian National Institute for the Blind}}, receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 1946 || Research/program || {{w|Helen Keller}} makes the first of many trips under the auspices of the Foundation to investigate the conditions and needs of blind people in all parts of the world.<ref name="Our History"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 1966 || || The First African Conference on Work for the Blind is held, prompting discussions about taking steps to prevent blindness while continuing to help those already afflicted.<ref name="Our History"/>
+
| 1949 || Conference || Spearheaded by the {{w|American Foundation for the Overseas Blind}}, an International Conference of Workers for the Blind, attended by representatives of the {{w|United Nations}} and {{w|UNESCO}} is held. Resolutions are passed, stressing the need to give blind people the physical, psychological and technical means to take their place in society, with a particular emphasis on education.<ref name="Our History"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 1968 || Recognition by HKI || George L. Raverat, director of the European Office of the American Foundation for Overseas Blind, receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 1959 || Program launch || The American Foundation for the Overseas Blind initiates the Helen Keller Crusade for the Blind, named to honor the leadership and inspiration she has given for many years. The purpose of the Crusade is to expand public awareness of and support of the Foundation’s programs.<ref name="Our History"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 1970 || Recognition by HKI || British public health advocate [[w:John Wilson (blind activist)|John Wilson]] receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 1959 || Recognition by HKI || The Spirit of Helen Keller Award is established, commemorating her legacy and expressing appreciation for her role as a founder, trustee and staff member of Helen Keller International.<ref name="Our History"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 1971 || Policy || HKI starts moving into the area of prevention, and becomes involved in the prevention and treatment of widespread {{w|vitamin A}} deficiency leading to {{w|xerophthalmia}} and {{w|keratomalacia}}.<ref name="APPLICATION FROM AN INTERNATIONAL NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION REQUESTING OFFICIAL RELATIONS WITH WHO 1"/>
+
| 1960 || Recognition by HKI || [[w:Edwin Baker (CNIB)Edwin Baker|Edwin Baker]], founder of the {{w|Canadian National Institute for the Blind}}, receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> || 
 
|-
 
|-
| 1973 || Recognition by HKI || James S. Adams, president of {{w|Research to Prevent Blindness}}, receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 1965 || Helen Keller biography || {{w|Helen Keller}} is elected to the National Women’s Hall of Fame and is named by [[w:Gallup (company)|Gallup]] (the poll people) as one of the Most Widely Admired People of the 20th Century.<ref name="June 27, 1980"/> || {{w|United States}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 1976 || Recognition by HKI || John Ferre, United States Director of the National Society for the Prevention of Blindness, receives posthumously the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 1966 || Conference || The First African Conference on Work for the Blind is held, prompting discussions about taking steps to prevent blindness while continuing to help those already afflicted.<ref name="Our History"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 1976 || || HKI publishes ''Xerophthalmia'', a paper delivered to HKI's Board of Trustees by the WHO Medical Officer in charge of Nutrition Research.<ref name="APPLICATION FROM AN INTERNATIONAL NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION REQUESTING OFFICIAL RELATIONS WITH WHO 1"/>
+
| 1968 || Recognition by HKI || George L. Raverat, director of the European Office of the American Foundation for Overseas Blind, receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 1977 || || The American Foundation for the Overseas Blind adopts the name Helen Keller International to honour Keller’s contributions to the organization and to the blind and disadvantaged.<ref name="Helen Keller International"/>
+
| 1968 || Helen Keller biography || {{w|Helen Keller}} dies at her home in {{w|Connecticut}}.<ref name="Helen Keller's Life and Legacy">{{cite web |title=Helen Keller's Life and Legacy |url=https://www.hki.org/helen-kellers-life-and-legacy#.Xbspo5L0mUk |website=hki.org |accessdate=31 October 2019}}</ref> || {{w|United States}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 1977 || Recognition by HKI || {{w|UNICEF}} executive director {{w|Henry Richardson Labouisse Jr.}} receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 1970 || Recognition by HKI || British public health advocate [[w:John Wilson (blind activist)|John Wilson]] receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> || 
 
|-
 
|-
| 1978 || || The {{w|World HEalth Organization}}, in collaboration with HKI, publishes the Field Guide to the Detection and Treatment of Xerophthalmia.<ref name="APPLICATION FROM AN INTERNATIONAL NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION REQUESTING OFFICIAL RELATIONS WITH WHO 1"/>
+
| 1971 || Policy || HKI starts moving into the area of prevention, and becomes involved in the prevention and treatment of widespread {{w|vitamin A}} deficiency leading to {{w|xerophthalmia}} and {{w|keratomalacia}}.<ref name="APPLICATION FROM AN INTERNATIONAL NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION REQUESTING OFFICIAL RELATIONS WITH WHO 1"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 1978 || || Eric T. Boulter, Director-General of the UK {{w|Royal National Institute for the Blind}} receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 1973 || Recognition by HKI || James S. Adams, president of {{w|Research to Prevent Blindness}}, receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 1979 || || The International Association of Lions Clubs receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 1975 || Assistance || HKI starts working in the {{w|Philippines}}.<ref>{{cite web |title=Helen Keller International (HKI) |url=https://ncsp.org.ph/helen-keller-international-hki-5992ea91c622 |website=ncsp.org.ph |accessdate=31 October 2019}}</ref> || {{w|Philippines}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 1980 || || The {{w|Helen Keller Day}} is innaugurated on June 27 as a commemorative holiday to celebrate the birth of Helen Keller. The holiday observance is created by presidential proclamation.
+
| 1976 || Recognition by HKI || John Ferre, United States Director of the National Society for the Prevention of Blindness, receives posthumously the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 1980 || || The United States Agency for International Development receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>   
+
| 1976 || Publication || HKI publishes ''Xerophthalmia'', a paper delivered to HKI's Board of Trustees by the WHO Medical Officer in charge of Nutrition Research.<ref name="APPLICATION FROM AN INTERNATIONAL NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION REQUESTING OFFICIAL RELATIONS WITH WHO 1"/> ||  
 
|-
 
|-
| 1980 || || HKI initiates efforts aimed at integrating primary eye care into primary health care.<ref name="APPLICATION FROM AN INTERNATIONAL NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION REQUESTING OFFICIAL RELATIONS WITH WHO 1">{{cite web |title=APPLICATION FROM AN INTERNATIONAL NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION REQUESTING OFFICIAL RELATIONS WITH WHO 1 |url=https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/161820/EB77_NGO-7_eng.pdf;jsessionid=5F32E16AC409E99A82A0E90BFD57626C?sequence=1 |website=apps.who.int |accessdate=5 September 2019}}</ref>
+
| 1977 || Renaming || The American Foundation for the Overseas Blind adopts the name Helen Keller International to honour Keller’s contributions to the organization and to the blind and disadvantaged.<ref name="Helen Keller International"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 1980 || || HKI supports six country programs with a budget of around US$1 million.<ref>{{cite web |title=World Blindness and its Prevention |url=https://archive.org/stream/worldblindnessit04edit/worldblindnessit04edit_djvu.txt |website=archive.org |accessdate=5 September 2019}}</ref>
+
| 1977 || Recognition by HKI || {{w|UNICEF}} executive director {{w|Henry Richardson Labouisse Jr.}} receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> || 
 
|-
 
|-
| 1982 || || HKI and {{w|WHO}} collaboratively publish the Technical Report Series No. 72, ''Control of Vitamin A Deficiency and Xerophthalmia''.<ref name="APPLICATION FROM AN INTERNATIONAL NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION REQUESTING OFFICIAL RELATIONS WITH WHO 1"/>  
+
| 1978 || Publication || The {{w|World Health Organization}}, in collaboration with HKI, publishes the Field Guide to the Detection and Treatment of Xerophthalmia.<ref name="APPLICATION FROM AN INTERNATIONAL NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION REQUESTING OFFICIAL RELATIONS WITH WHO 1"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 1983 || Recognition by HKI || Japanese businessman {{w|Ryoichi Sasakawa}} receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>  
+
| 1978 || Recognition by HKI || Eric T. Boulter, Director-General of the UK {{w|Royal National Institute for the Blind}} receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 1987 || Recognition by HKI || Indian ophthalmologist {{w|Govindappa Venkataswamy}} receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>  
+
| 1978 || Assistance || HKI starts working in Bangladesh.<ref>{{cite web |title=Helen Keller International |url=https://www.hki.org/sites/default/files/attach/2018/01/HKI%20Internship%20Announcement%20-Policy%20Mapping%20Intern%20-%20Bangladesh.pdf |website=hki.org |accessdate=10 November 2019}}</ref> || {{w|Bangladesh}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 1988 || Recognition by HKI || Dr. Christy (famous along with his wife, Dorothy, for their dedicated service to the cataract poor of {{w|Taxila, Pakistan}} receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>  
+
| 1979 || Recognition by HKI || The International Association of Lions Clubs receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 1988 || || HKI conducts a pilot Home Gardening project among 1,000 households in {{w|Bangladesh}}. Later in the early 1990s, based on the results and experience gained from this pilot project, HKI would start the NGO Gardening and Nutrition Education Surveillance Project (NGNESP).<ref>{{cite web |title=Homestead Food Production – A Strategy to Combat Malnutrition & Poverty |url=http://www.international-food-safety.com/pdf/HFP_Strategy_Combat_Malnutrition_Poverty_2001.pdf |website=international-food-safety.com |accessdate=5 September 2019}}</ref>
+
| 1980 || Recognition to HK || The {{w|Helen Keller Day}} is innaugurated on June 27 as a commemorative holiday to celebrate the birth of Helen Keller. The holiday observance is created by presidential proclamation.<ref name="June 27, 1980">{{cite web |title=June 27, 1980: Helen Keller Day Established |url=https://www.historyandheadlines.com/june-27-1980-helen-keller-day-established/ |website=historyandheadlines.com |accessdate=10 November 2019}}</ref> || {{w|United States}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 1988 || || HKI, in collaboration with {{w|World Food Programme}} and {{w|Institute of Nutrition and Food Science}}, compiles and publishes the first English version of a Food Composition Table (FCT) for {{w|Bangladesh}} named ''Tables of Nutrient Composition of Bangladeshi Foods'', which includes old and new data from Bangladesh and some borrowed data from the Indian Food Composition Tables.<ref>{{cite web |title=FOOD COMPOSITION TABLE FOR BANGLADESH - AGRICULTURE |url=https://vdocuments.mx/food-composition-table-for-bangladesh-agriculture.html |website=vdocuments.mx |accessdate=5 September 2019}}</ref>
+
| 1980 || Recognition by HKI || The United States Agency for International Development receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> || {{w|United States}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 1989 || Recognition by HKI || {{w|Merck & Co.}} and Dr. Susan T. Pettiss (Director of Vitamin A Program of Helen Keller International) receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>  
+
| 1980 || Assistance || HKI initiates efforts aimed at integrating primary eye care into primary health care.<ref name="APPLICATION FROM AN INTERNATIONAL NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION REQUESTING OFFICIAL RELATIONS WITH WHO 1">{{cite web |title=APPLICATION FROM AN INTERNATIONAL NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION REQUESTING OFFICIAL RELATIONS WITH WHO 1 |url=https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/161820/EB77_NGO-7_eng.pdf;jsessionid=5F32E16AC409E99A82A0E90BFD57626C?sequence=1 |website=apps.who.int |accessdate=5 September 2019}}</ref> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 1990 || Program launch || HKI launches the Nutrition Surveillance Project (NSP) to monitor the health impact of severe flooding in {{w|Bangladesh}}. It is a collaborative effort which involves the Government of Bangladesh (GOB), international and local Non-Governmental Organisations (NGO)."<ref>{{cite web|title=Food Security and Nutrition Surveillance Bulletin Report 2010 |url=http://www.hki.org/research/HKI%20Bulletin%20Bangladesh%20Sept%2010%20Food%20Security%20and%20Nutrition%20Surveillance.pdf |deadurl=yes |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20110526053358/http://www.hki.org/research/HKI%20Bulletin%20Bangladesh%20Sept%2010%20Food%20Security%20and%20Nutrition%20Surveillance.pdf |archivedate=2011-05-26 |df= }}</ref>
+
| 1980 || Assistance || HKI supports six country programs with a budget of around US$1 million.<ref>{{cite web |title=World Blindness and its Prevention |url=https://archive.org/stream/worldblindnessit04edit/worldblindnessit04edit_djvu.txt |website=archive.org |accessdate=5 September 2019}}</ref> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 1991 || || Dr. Francisco Contreras (Director General of the Instituto Nacional de Oftalmología, Perú), Dr. Newton Kara Jose (Director of University of Campinas, Brazil), Hoffmann-La Roche Task Force, and the humanitarian nutrition think tank {{w|Sight and Life}} receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>  
+
| 1982 || Publication || HKI and {{w|WHO}} collaboratively publish the Technical Report Series No. 72, ''Control of Vitamin A Deficiency and Xerophthalmia''.<ref name="APPLICATION FROM AN INTERNATIONAL NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION REQUESTING OFFICIAL RELATIONS WITH WHO 1"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 1993 || Program launch || Following the initial success of the Homstead Food Production program as a pilot project in Bangladesh with 1000 households participating, HKI launches the NGO Gardening and Nutrition Education Surveillance Project (NGNESP) which expands the program to communities across the country.<ref>{{cite web|title=Millions fed: Proven successes in agricultural development |url=http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/oc64ch21.pdf |deadurl=yes |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20130228192751/http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/oc64ch21.pdf |archivedate=2013-02-28 |df= }}</ref> 
+
| 1983 || Recognition by HKI || Japanese businessman {{w|Ryoichi Sasakawa}} receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 1994 || || Indonesian President {{w|Suharto}}, American diplomat {{w|J. Brian Atwood}} (Administrator of {{w|USAID}}), United States Congressman {{w|Tony P. Hall}}, and Donald H. Hubbs, (Chairman of The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation) receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 1984 || International expansion || HKI establishes an office in {{w|Tanzania}}.<ref>{{cite web |title=helen keller international |url=https://jobs.tz.cari.africa/jobs/helen-keller-international |website=jobs.tz.cari.africa |accessdate=31 October 2019}}</ref> || {{w|Tanzania}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 1998 || || [[w:Jansen Noyes Jr.|Jansen Noyes III]] receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 1986 || Assistance || HKI starts its programs in {{w|Burkina Faso}}.<ref name="Helen Keller Internationaldd">{{cite web |title=Helen Keller International |url=https://www.hki.org/sites/default/files/attach/2018/01/HKI%20Job%20Announcement%20-%20Strategic%20Coordination%20&%20Learning%20Advisor,%20FFP,%20Burkina%20Faso.pdf |website=hki.org |accessdate=31 October 2019}}</ref> || {{w|Burkina Faso}}
 +
|-
 +
| 1987 || Recognition by HKI || Indian ophthalmologist {{w|Govindappa Venkataswamy}} receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 1999 || || Japanese writer {{w|Ayako Sono}} and South African activist {{w|Desmond Tutu}} receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>.
+
| 1988 || Recognition by HKI || Dr. Christy (famous along with his wife, Dorothy, for their dedicated service to the cataract poor of {{w|Taxila, Pakistan}} receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> || 
 
|-
 
|-
| 2000 || || King {{w|Mohammed VI of Morocco}}, Gale Bensussen (president of {{w|Leiner Health Products}}), and John S. Crowley (Chairman Emeritus of Helen Keller Worldwide) receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 1988 || Program launch || HKI conducts a pilot Home Gardening project among 1,000 households in {{w|Bangladesh}}. Later in the early 1990s, based on the results and experience gained from this pilot project, HKI would start the NGO Gardening and Nutrition Education Surveillance Project (NGNESP).<ref>{{cite web |title=Homestead Food Production – A Strategy to Combat Malnutrition & Poverty |url=http://www.international-food-safety.com/pdf/HFP_Strategy_Combat_Malnutrition_Poverty_2001.pdf |website=international-food-safety.com |accessdate=5 September 2019}}</ref> || {{w|Bangladesh}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 2001 || || HKI offices in {{w|New York City}} are destroyed during the {{w|September 11 attacks}} on the {{w|World Trade Center}}. No employees were injured, although Helen Keller’s archives are lost.<ref name="Our History"/>
+
| 1988 || Publication || HKI, in collaboration with {{w|World Food Programme}} and {{w|Institute of Nutrition and Food Science}}, compiles and publishes the first English version of a Food Composition Table (FCT) for {{w|Bangladesh}} named ''Tables of Nutrient Composition of Bangladeshi Foods'', which includes old and new data from Bangladesh and some borrowed data from the Indian Food Composition Tables.<ref>{{cite web |title=FOOD COMPOSITION TABLE FOR BANGLADESH - AGRICULTURE |url=https://vdocuments.mx/food-composition-table-for-bangladesh-agriculture.html |website=vdocuments.mx |accessdate=5 September 2019}}</ref> || {{w|Bangladesh}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 2002 || || "A 2002 research shows that in a 3 months period, households participating in the HFP consumed had a daily per capita consumption of vegetables of 160g, more than double of the 71g for non-participating households.<ref>{{cite web|title=Impact of a homestead gardening program on household food security and empowerment of women in Bangladesh |url=http://docserver.ingentaconnect.com/deliver/connect/nsinf/03795721/v26n1/s2.pdf?expires=1329377878&id=67237629&titleid=41000042&accname=Guest+User&checksum=EEFB1BA8E8BE2A990DE161EAB6339BC6 |archive-url=https://archive.is/20120708143659/http://docserver.ingentaconnect.com/deliver/connect/nsinf/03795721/v26n1/s2.pdf?expires=1329377878&id=67237629&titleid=41000042&accname=Guest+User&checksum=EEFB1BA8E8BE2A990DE161EAB6339BC6 |dead-url=yes |archive-date=2012-07-08 }}</ref>
+
| 1988 || Assistance || HKI starts operating in {{w|Nepal}}.<ref>{{cite web |title=Helen Keller International in Nepal |url=https://www.hki.org/helen-keller-international-nepal#.Xbsh7ZL0mUk |website=hki.org |accessdate=31 October 2019}}</ref> || {{w|Nepal}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 2004 || || ". After the 2004 tsunami, we distribute multi-micronutrient Sprinkles® as part of the large-scale relief efforts. "<ref name="Our History"/>
+
| 1989 || Recognition by HKI || {{w|Merck & Co.}} and Dr. Susan T. Pettiss (Director of Vitamin A Program of Helen Keller International) receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> || 
 
|-
 
|-
| 2005 || Recognition by HKI || "The Helen Keller Visionary Award was established in 2005 to recognize institutional friends whose generosity and innovations advance our mission. The first recipient in 2006 was H.J. Heinz Company and William R. Johnson, Chairman, President & CEO. "<ref name="Our History"/>
+
| 1990 || Program launch || HKI launches the Nutrition Surveillance Project (NSP) to monitor the health impact of severe flooding in {{w|Bangladesh}}. It is a collaborative effort which involves the Government of Bangladesh (GOB), international and local Non-Governmental Organisations (NGO).<ref>{{cite web|title=Food Security and Nutrition Surveillance Bulletin Report 2010 |url=http://www.hki.org/research/HKI%20Bulletin%20Bangladesh%20Sept%2010%20Food%20Security%20and%20Nutrition%20Surveillance.pdf |deadurl=yes |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20110526053358/http://www.hki.org/research/HKI%20Bulletin%20Bangladesh%20Sept%2010%20Food%20Security%20and%20Nutrition%20Surveillance.pdf |archivedate=2011-05-26 |df= }}</ref><ref>{{cite web |title=Using data from a nationally representative nutrition surveillance system to assess trends and influence nutrition programs and policy |url=https://journals.openedition.org/factsreports/pdf/395 |accessdate=31 October 2019}}</ref> || {{w|Bangladesh}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 2005 || Recognition by HKI || The Helen Keller Legacy Award is established to recognize the significant on-going support of an institution for the work of Helen Keller International. In the same year, the Helen Keller Visionary Award is established "to recognize institutional friends whose generosity and innovations" advance HKI's mission.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>  
+
| 1991 || Recognition by HKI || Dr. Francisco Contreras (Director General of the Instituto Nacional de Oftalmología, Perú), Dr. Newton Kara Jose (Director of University of Campinas, Brazil), Hoffmann-La Roche Task Force, and the humanitarian nutrition think tank {{w|Sight and Life}} receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> || 
 
|-
 
|-
| 2006 || Recognition by HKI || The Helen Keller Visionary Award is established to "recognize institutional friends whose generosity and innovations advance our mission". H.J. Heinz Company and its chairman, president & CEO William R. Johnson become the first recipient.<ref name="Our History"/>
+
| 1992 (February) || Study || HKI convenes a meeting of concerned scientists, health officials, and policy makers to examine the role of {{w|vitamin A}} status on the health of children in {{w|developing countries}}.<ref name="pdfs.semanticscholar.org">{{cite web |title=Bellagio meeting on vitamin a deficiency |url=https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/6986/cf87fedd6c27dd46e469985aeceb0d660893.pdf |website=pdfs.semanticscholar.org |accessdate=30 October 2019}}</ref> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 2006 || Recognition by HKI || International law firm {{w|Sullivan & Cromwell}} receives the Helen Keller Legacy Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>  
+
| 1992 || Assistance || HKI begins its activities in {{w|Cameroon}} with the fight against river blindness in {{w|Monatélé}}, [[w:Centre Region (Cameroon)|Centre region]].<ref>{{cite web |title=GRANTS OFFICER |url=https://cm.neuvoo.com/view/?id=3f5e36ee7e66 |website=cm.neuvoo.com |accessdate=31 October 2019}}</ref> || {{w|Cameroon}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 2006 || Recognition by HKI || American ophthalmologist {{w|Alfred Sommer}} from {{w|Johns Hopkins University}} receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 1993 || Program launch || Following the initial success of the Homstead Food Production program as a pilot project in Bangladesh with 1000 households participating, HKI launches the NGO Gardening and Nutrition Education Surveillance Project (NGNESP) which expands the program to communities across the country.<ref>{{cite web|title=Millions fed: Proven successes in agricultural development |url=http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/oc64ch21.pdf |deadurl=yes |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20130228192751/http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/oc64ch21.pdf |archivedate=2013-02-28 |df= }}</ref> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 2006 || Recognition by HKI || The {{w|H. J. Heinz Company}} and William R. Johnson, chairman, president and CEO of the former, receive the Helen Keller Visionary Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 1993 || Assistance || HKI starts collaborating with the Royal Government of Cambodia, {{w|UNICEF}}, and the {{w|World Health Organization}} in order to combat {{w|vitamin A}} deficiency through the distribution of vitamin A capsules (VAC).<ref>{{cite web |title=Suopporting document to the Micronutrient Workshop held on February 20, 2001,in Phnom Penh, Kingdom of Cambodia |url=https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/2802/90b0e41f916eadce29a8c1d6d1eda1aa2704.pdf |website=pdfs.semanticscholar.org |accessdate=31 October 2019}}</ref> || {{w|Cambodia}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 2007 || Recognition by HKI || The Helen Keller Humanitarian Award is established "to recognize the significant support of individuals or institutions for their sustained humanitarian efforts around the world."<ref name="Our History"/>
+
| 1994 || Recognition by HKI || Indonesian President {{w|Suharto}}, American diplomat {{w|J. Brian Atwood}} (Administrator of {{w|USAID}}), United States Congressman {{w|Tony P. Hall}}, and Donald H. Hubbs, (Chairman of The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation) receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 2007 || Recognition by HKI || Daniel G. Sisler, Ph.D, Retiring Chair of HKI Board of Trustees, receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 1998 || Recognition by HKI || [[w:Jansen Noyes Jr.|Jansen Noyes III]] receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 2007 || Recognition by HKI || American global pharmaceutical company {{w|Allergan, Inc.}} and David E.I. Pyott, CBE, chairman of the board, and CEO of the former receive the Helen Keller Legacy Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 1999 || International expansion || HKI opens an operating office in {{w|Burkina Faso}}.<ref name="Helen Keller Internationaldd"/> || {{w|Burkina Faso}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 2008 || Recognition by HKI || [[w:Gordon Gund|Gordon]] and Llura Gund, co-founders of the Foundation Fighting Blindness, receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 1999 || Recognition by HKI || Japanese writer {{w|Ayako Sono}} and South African activist {{w|Desmond Tutu}} receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 2008 || Recognition by HKI || {{w|Merck & Co.}} and its President & CEO Richard T. Clark, become the first recipients of The Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.<ref name="Our History"/><ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 1999 || Assistance || HKI starts supporting the {{w|Mali}} government’s efforts in the fight against malnutrition by implementing a wide range of activities including: {{w|Vitamin A}} supplementation, food fortification, essential nutrition actions and community-based management of acute malnutrition (CMAM).<ref>{{cite web |title=SPRING Chief of Party, Mali |url=https://www.hki.org/sites/default/files/attach/2015/08/HKI%20Job%20Announcement%20-%20SPRING%20Chief%20of%20Party,%20Mali.pdf |website=hki.org |accessdate=31 October 2019}}</ref> || {{w|Mali}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 2009 || Recognition || HKI receives the 2009 Champalimaud Award for its blindness prevention work in developing countries.<ref name="Our History"/>
+
| 2000 || Assistance || HKI begins operating in {{w|Côte d'Ivoire}}.<ref>{{cite web |title=Helen Keller International |url=https://www.hki.org/sites/default/files/attach/2019/02/HKI%20Job%20Announcement%20-%20Country%20Director%20Cote%20d%27Ivoire.pdf |website=hki.org |accessdate=31 October 2019}}</ref> || {{w|Côte d'Ivoire}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 2009 || Recognition || {{w|Consumers Digest}} lists HKI as one of America’s Top Charities. This distinction is awarded because its cost-effective fundraising.<ref name="Our History"/>
+
| 2000 || Recognition by HKI || King {{w|Mohammed VI of Morocco}}, Gale Bensussen (president of {{w|Leiner Health Products}}), and John S. Crowley (Chairman Emeritus of Helen Keller Worldwide) receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 2009 || || American social entrepreneur [[w:David Green (social entrepreneur)|David Green]] receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 2000 || Assistance || HKI starts its programs in {{w|Guinea}} in 2000 with an initial focus on nutrition.<ref>{{cite web |title=Helen Keller International |url=https://www.hki.org/sites/default/files/attach/2019/05/HKI%20Job%20Announcement%20-%20Country%20Director%20Guinea.docx.pdf |website=hki.org |accessdate=31 October 2019}}</ref> || {{w|Guinea}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 2009 || || {{w|Johnson & Johnson}} and Brian D. Perkins, Corporate Vice President of Corporate Affairs, receives the Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>  
+
| 2001 || Terrorist attack || HKI offices in {{w|New York City}} are destroyed during the {{w|September 11 attacks}} on the {{w|World Trade Center}}. No employees were injured, although Helen Keller’s archives are lost.<ref name="Our History"/> || {{w|United States}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 2009 || Recognition by HKI || Christie’s Inc. and Christopher Burge, chairman of the former, receive the Helen Keller Legacy Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 2002 || International expansion || HKI establishes regional office for Africa in {{w|Dakar}}, {{w|Senegal}}.<ref>{{cite web |title=Centennial Celebration in Dakar, Senegal |url=https://www.hki.org/centennial-celebration-dakar-senegal#.XbsQ2pL0mUk |website=hki.org |accessdate=31 October 2019}}</ref> || {{w|Senegal}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 2010 || Recognition by HKI || {{w|Perkins School for the Blind}} in {{w|Watertown, Massachusetts}} receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 2002 || Assistance || HKI begins working in {{w|Sierra Leone}}.<ref>{{cite web |title=Mass Drug Administration for Schistosomiasis and Soil Transmitted Helminthes: Sierra Leone 2010 Campaign |url=http://www.ph.ucla.edu/fieldstudies/chs_2010/Feldman%20Abstract.doc |accessdate=31 October 2019}}</ref> || {{w|Sierra Leone}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 2010 || || The {{w|Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition}} (GAIN) receives the Helen Keller Visionary Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 2003 || Assistance || {{w|Indonesia}}’s Ministry of Education invites HKI to assist children with disabilities, especially those who are poor and in vulnerable situations.<ref>{{cite web |title=Education Access for Blind Children In Indonesia |url=https://www.hki.org/updates/education-access-blind-children-indonesia#.XbslU5L0mUk |website=hki.org |accessdate=31 October 2019}}</ref> || {{w|Indonesia}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 2011 || Recognition || HKI is included in Pulitzer prize-winning New York Times columnist, Nicholas Kristof’s "Gifts That Say You Care" holiday giving column. “Helen Keller International...gets more bang for the buck than almost any group I can think of.<ref name="Our History">{{cite web |title=Our History |url=https://www.hki.org/our-impact/about-us/history#.XW-6cy70mUk |website=hki.org |accessdate=4 September 2019}}</ref>
+
| 2003 || Assistance || HKI enables the distribution of {{w|Mectizan}} to over 2.5 million people across Africa.<ref name="iapb.org">{{cite web |title=Helen Keller International |url=https://www.iapb.org/member/helen-keller-international/ |website=iapb.org |accessdate=1 November 2019}}</ref> || {{w|Africa}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 2011 || Recognition by HKI || Reader’s Digest, Partners for Sight Foundation receives the Helen Keller Legacy Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 2003 || Assistance || HKI provides 34,000 free pairs of eyeglasses to students in the state of {{w|Oaxaca}}, {{w|Mexico}}.<ref name="iapb.org"/> || {{w|Mexico}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 2011 || || French retailer {{w|L'Occitane en Provence}} receives the Helen Keller Visionary Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 2004 || Assistance || Following the {{w|2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami}}, HKI distributes multi-micronutrient Sprinkles as part of the large-scale relief efforts.<ref name="Our History"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 2012 || Recognition by HKI || American epidemiologist {{w|William Foege}} receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 2004 || Partnership || HKI partners with the [[w:Standard Chartered|Standard Chartered Bank]] (SCB) to provide eye glasses, support cataract surgeries, and distribute {{w|Vitamin A}} capsules in {{w|Indonesia}}.<ref>{{cite web |title=Standard Chartered Bank and Helen Keller International Collaboration in Indonesia |url=http://www.phi.org/resources/?resource=standard-chartered-bank-and-helen-keller-international-collaboration-in-indonesia |website=phi.org |accessdate=30 October 2019}}</ref> || {{w|Indonesia}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 2013 || Recognition by HKI || United States Secretary of State {{w|Hillary Clinton}} receives the Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 2005 || Recognition by HKI || The Helen Keller Visionary Award is established to recognize institutional friends "whose generosity and innovations advance" HKI mission.<ref name="Our History"/> The Helen Keller Legacy Award is established to recognize the significant on-going support of an institution for the work of Helen Keller International.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 2013 || Recognition by HKI || HKI Board member Kate Ganz receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 2006 || Recognition by HKI || International law firm {{w|Sullivan & Cromwell}} receives the Helen Keller Legacy Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> American ophthalmologist {{w|Alfred Sommer}} from {{w|Johns Hopkins University}} receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> The {{w|H. J. Heinz Company}} and William R. Johnson, chairman, president and CEO of the former, receive the Helen Keller Visionary Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 2013 || || Barry Palmer, vice president of {{w|Lions Club International}}, receives the Helen Keller Visionary Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 2007 || Recognition by HKI || The Helen Keller Humanitarian Award is established "to recognize the significant support of individuals or institutions for their sustained humanitarian efforts around the world."<ref name="Our History"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 2014 || Recognition by HKI || Irish economist and humanitarian [[w:Tom Arnold (economist)|Tom Arnold]] receives the Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 2007 || Recognition by HKI || Daniel G. Sisler, Ph.D, Retiring Chair of HKI Board of Trustees, receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> American global pharmaceutical company {{w|Allergan, Inc.}} and David E.I. Pyott, CBE, chairman of the board, and CEO of the former receive the Helen Keller Legacy Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 2014 || Recognition || HKI becomes the tenth recipient of the Henry R. Kravis Prize in Leadership in recognition of its worldwide fight against blindness and malnutrition. The Award is accepted by Kathy Spahn, HKI's President & CEO.<ref name="Our History"/>
+
| 2008 || Recognition by HKI || [[w:Gordon Gund|Gordon]] and Llura Gund, co-founders of the Foundation Fighting Blindness, receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> {{w|Merck & Co.}} and its President & CEO Richard T. Clark, become the first recipients of The Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.<ref name="Our History"/><ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>  ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 2014 || Recognition || Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn ''A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunities'' featuring the work of HKI.<ref name="Our History"/>
+
| 2009 (September) || Recognition to HKI || HKI receives the 2009 Champalimaud Award for its blindness prevention work in developing countries.<ref>{{cite web |title=Portuguese award goes to Helen Keller nonprofit |url=https://medicalxpress.com/news/2009-09-portuguese-award-helen-keller-nonprofit.html |website=medicalxpress.com |accessdate=31 October 2019}}</ref><ref name="Our History"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 2014 || Recognition to HKI|| "Helen Keller International has received the 2014 [[BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award]]"
+
| 2009 || Recognition to HKI || {{w|Consumers Digest}} lists HKI as one of America’s Top Charities. This distinction is awarded because its cost-effective fundraising.<ref name="Our History"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 2015 || Recognition by HKI || The Bill and Melinda Gates, Co-Chairs, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 2009 || Recognition by HKI || American social entrepreneur [[w:David Green (social entrepreneur)|David Green]] receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> {{w|Johnson & Johnson}} and Brian D. Perkins, Corporate Vice President of Corporate Affairs, receives the Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> Christie’s Inc. and Christopher Burge, chairman of the former, receive the Helen Keller Legacy Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 2015 || Recognition by HKI || Dr. {{w|David Nabarro}}, {{w|United Nations}} Secretary-General’s Special Envoy on Ebola, receives the Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 2010 || Recognition by HKI || {{w|Perkins School for the Blind}} in {{w|Watertown, Massachusetts}} receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> The {{w|Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition}} (GAIN) receives the Helen Keller Visionary Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 2016 || Recognition by HKI || Ban Ki-moon, Secretary-General of the United Nations receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 2011 || Recognition || HKI is included in Pulitzer prize-winning New York Times columnist, Nicholas Kristof’s "Gifts That Say You Care" holiday giving column. “Helen Keller International...gets more bang for the buck than almost any group I can think of.<ref name="Our History">{{cite web |title=Our History |url=https://www.hki.org/our-impact/about-us/history#.XW-6cy70mUk |website=hki.org |accessdate=4 September 2019}}</ref> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 2016 || Recognition by HKI || Desmond Fitzgerald, founder of Hope for Poor Children Foundation, receives the Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 2011 || Recognition by HKI || Reader’s Digest, Partners for Sight Foundation receives the Helen Keller Legacy Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> French retailer {{w|L'Occitane en Provence}} receives the Helen Keller Visionary Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 2017 || Recognition by HKI || Jim Alling, CEO of global giving company TOMS, receives the Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 2012 || Recognition by HKI || American epidemiologist {{w|William Foege}} receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 2018 || Recognition by HKI || Yetnebersh Nigussie, Disability rights activist and inclusion advisor at Light for the World receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 2013 || Recognition by HKI || United States Secretary of State {{w|Hillary Clinton}} receives the Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> HKI Board member Kate Ganz receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> Barry Palmer, vice president of {{w|Lions Club International}}, receives the Helen Keller Visionary Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 
|-
 
|-
| 2018 || Recognition by HKI || Bradford Perkins, founder, chairman and CEO of Perkins Eastman Architects, receives the Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/>
+
| 2013–2015 || Assistance || HKI provides over 200 million {{w|vitamin A}} capsules to children 6-59 months of age in 13 African countries during this period.<ref>{{cite web |title=Reaching Millions |url=https://www.hki.org/our-impact/reaching-millions#.XbrnRpL0mUk |website=hki.org |accessdate=31 October 2019}}</ref> || {{w|Africa}}
 
|-
 
|-
| 2019 || Recognition by HKI || Dr. Andrew S. Fisher and The Lavelle Fund for the Blind receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019">{{cite web |title=Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019 |url=https://www.hki.org/helen-keller-international-award-recipients#.XW_Iii70mUk |website=hki.org |accessdate=4 September 2019}}</ref>
+
| 2014 || Recognition by HKI || Irish economist and humanitarian [[w:Tom Arnold (economist)|Tom Arnold]] receives the Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 +
|-
 +
| 2014 || Recognition || HKI becomes the tenth recipient of the Henry R. Kravis Prize in Leadership in recognition of its worldwide fight against blindness and malnutrition. The Award is accepted by Kathy Spahn, HKI's President & CEO.<ref name="Our History"/> ||
 +
|-
 +
| 2014 || Recognition || Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn ''A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunities'' featuring the work of HKI.<ref name="Our History"/> ||
 +
|-
 +
| 2015 (February) || Recognition to HKI|| HKI is selected to receive the 2015 {{w|BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award}}.<ref>{{cite web |title=Helen Keller International Wins BBVA Award |url=https://www.hki.org/updates/helen-keller-international-wins-bbva-award#.Xbni25L0mUk |website=hki.org |accessdate=30 October 2019}}</ref> ||
 +
|-
 +
| 2015 (May) || Recognition by HKI || {{w|Bill Gates}} and {{w|Melinda Gates}} receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/><ref>{{cite web |title=Bill And Melinda Gates Honored With Spirit Of Helen Keller Award |url=https://www.looktothestars.org/news/13726-bill-and-melinda-gates-honored-with-spirit-of-helen-keller-award |website=looktothestars.org |accessdate=31 October 2019}}</ref>  Dr. {{w|David Nabarro}}, {{w|United Nations}} Secretary-General’s Special Envoy on Ebola, receives the Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 +
|-
 +
| 2016 || Recognition by HKI || Ban Ki-moon, Secretary-General of the United Nations receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> Desmond Fitzgerald, founder of Hope for Poor Children Foundation, receives the Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/><ref>{{cite web |title=HKI to Honor Ban Ki-moon and Desmond FitzGerald at Annual Spirit of Helen Keller Gala |url=https://www.hki.org/updates/hki-honor-ban-ki-moon-and-desmond-fitzgerald-annual-spirit-helen-keller-gala#.XbnLR5L0mUk |website=hki.org |accessdate=30 October 2019}}</ref> ||
 +
|-
 +
| 2016 (October) || Assistance || HKI and Christian development organization Effect:Hope start supporting Vitamin A Supplementation and deworming programs in the Kilifi, [[w:Kwale County|Kwale]] and [[w:Siaya County|Siaya]] counties in {{w|Kenya}}.<ref>{{cite web |title=Helen Keller International: Consultancy to support the final evaluation of the Every Child Thrives project in Kenya |url=https://www.en-net.org/question/3745.aspx |website=en-net.org |accessdate=30 October 2019}}</ref> ||
 +
|-
 +
| 2017 (May) || Recognition by HKI || Jim Alling, CEO of global giving company TOMS, receives the Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.<ref>{{cite web |title=2017 Spirit of Helen Keller Gala Wednesday |url=https://www.theculturenews.com/single-post/2017/05/09/2017-Spirit-of-Helen-Keller-Gala-Wednesday-May-10-2017-TOMS-to-Receive-Helen-Keller-Humanitarian-Award |website=theculturenews.com |accessdate=30 October 2019}}</ref><ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 +
|- 
 +
| 2017 (November 27) || Recognition || American charity evaluator {{w|GiveWell}} ranks HKI's vitamin A supplementation (VAS) program among its top charities for giving season 2017.<ref>{{cite web |title=The GiveWell Blog |url=https://blog.givewell.org/2017/11/27/our-top-charities-for-giving-season-2017/ |website=blog.givewell.org |accessdate=30 October 2019}}</ref> ||
 +
|-
 +
| 2018 (March) || Recognition by HKI || Yetnebersh Nigussie, Disability rights activist and inclusion advisor at Light for the World receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref>{{cite web |title=Helen Keller Award 2018 |url=https://www.light-for-the-world.org/helen-keller-award-2018 |website=light-for-the-world.org |accessdate=30 October 2019}}</ref><ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 +
|-
 +
| 2018 (March) || Assistance || HKI assists poor families in {{w|Vietnam}} prevent malnutrition by growing healthy food on small homestead farms. The organization also trains community nutrition volunteers to educate families and caregivers about what to feed infants and young children to ensure they get the nutrients they need for healthy development.<ref name="2018 Year in Review"/> || {{w|Vietnam}}
 +
|-
 +
| 2018 (April) || Partnership/contribution || HKI works in partnership with the Ministry of Health in {{w|Ivory Coast}} to provide children with {{w|Vitamin A}} supplements twice a year as part of the country’s regular health campaigns.<ref name="2018 Year in Review">{{cite web |title=2018 Year in Review |url=https://www.hki.org/updates/2018-year-review#.XbnuX5L0mUk |website=hki.org |accessdate=30 October 2019}}</ref> || {{w|Ivory Coast}}
 +
|-
 +
| 2018 (May) || Assistance || HKI launches emergency programs in {{w|Niger}} to improve sanitation and hygiene and prevent {{w|cholera}} outbreaks. The organization also distributed hygiene kits to vulnerable families.<ref name="2018 Year in Review"/> || {{w|Niger}}
 +
|-
 +
| 2018 (July) || Assistance || HKI works with partners in {{w|Mozambique}}’s {{w|Tete Province}} to prevent malnutrition among children under the age of five—and to improve the status of women in the poorest rural communities—through {{w|agriculture}}.<ref name="2018 Year in Review"/> || {{w|Mozambique}}
 +
|-
 +
| 2018 (September) || Assistance || HKI supports the {{w|Government of Cameroon}} to deliver mass distributions of {{w|invectin}} to prevent and treat {{w|onchocerciasis}} among at-risk populations. The organization completes a mass drug distribution campaign in [[w:Bafang|Bafang District]].<ref name="2018 Year in Review"/> || {{w|Cameroon}}
 +
|-
 +
| 2018 (October) || Assistance || HKI trains teams of community health workers in {{w|Tanzania}} with the purpose to bring health services right to people’s doorsteps on home visits to improve nutrition among vulnerable mothers and young children in the {{w|Mtwara Region}}.<ref name="2018 Year in Review"/> || {{w|Tanzania}}
 +
|-
 +
| 2018 (November) || Assistance || HKI assists rural communities in {{w|Cambodia}} to improve nutrition and increase their income through {{w|polyculture}} {{w|fish farming}}. Fish farmers are trained to raise several species of fish together in their ponds, with the purpose to increase their profits and help support the ecosystem.<ref name="2018 Year in Review"/> || {{w|Cambodia}}
 +
|-
 +
| 2018 || Recognition by HKI || Bradford Perkins, founder, chairman and CEO of Perkins Eastman Architects, receives the Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019"/> ||
 +
|-
 +
| 2018 (December 12) || Recognition || {{w|GiveWell}} recommends that US$6.5 million (about 10% of {{w|Good Ventures}} US$64 million grant for the year) be allocated to HKI’s vitamin A supplementation program.<ref>{{cite web |title=2018 Allocation to GiveWell Top Charities |url=https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/2018-allocation-givewell-top-charities |website=openphilanthropy.org |accessdate=30 October 2019}}</ref> ||
 +
|-
 +
| 2018 (December) || Assistance || HKI creates training groups of women farmers in {{w|Bangladesh}} with the purpose to increase harvests, improve profits marketing, generate more revenue for their families, and set up savings groups.<ref name="2018 Year in Review"/> || {{w|Bangladesh}}
 +
|-
 +
| 2019 || Recognition by HKI || Dr. Andrew S. Fisher and The Lavelle Fund for the Blind receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.<ref name="Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019">{{cite web |title=Helen Keller International Award Recipients, 1960–2019 |url=https://www.hki.org/helen-keller-international-award-recipients#.XW_Iii70mUk |website=hki.org |accessdate=4 September 2019}}</ref> ||
 
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|}
 
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===What the timeline is still missing===
 
===What the timeline is still missing===
 
* Givewell
 
* Helen Keller biography
 
  
 
===Timeline update strategy===
 
===Timeline update strategy===
  
 
==See also==
 
==See also==
 +
 +
* [[Timeline of GiveWell]]
  
 
==External links==
 
==External links==

Latest revision as of 16:17, 10 November 2019

This is a timeline of Helen Keller International, one of the oldest international nonprofit organizations devoted to preventing blindness and reducing malnutrition worldwide.[1]


Big picture

Time period Development summary More details
1880–1968 Helen Keller lifetime In her early months, Helen Keller from Tuscumbia, Alabama, becomes blind and deaf due to an illness. Instructed by Anne Sullivan, she would be the first deaf-blind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. This and other achievements lead Helen Keller to become the most famous disabled person in the world. Throughout her life, she would succeed as an author, political activist, and lecturer.
1915–1925 Early organization development In 1915, George and his wife Cora Parsons Kessler organize the British, French, and Belgian Permanent Blind Relief War Fund in Europe. In 1919, with support from Helen Keller, the Kesslers incorporate the Permanent Blind Relief War Fund for Soldiers & Sailors of the Allies in the United States.[2] In the 1920s the organization begins serving blind civilians, as well as military personnel, and also begins printing texts in Braille.[3]
1925–1946 American Braille Press for War and Civilian Blind The Permanent Blind Relief War Fund expands its focus beyond a purely war relief effort to one of aid and comfort to the civilian blind worldwide. The organization changes its name to the American Braille Press for War and Civilian Blind.[2]
1946–1977 American Foundation for the Overseas Blind After World War II, the Press affiliates with the American Foundation for the Blind. To reflect that close association, it changes its name to the American Foundation for the Overseas Blind (AFOB) and starts expanding its mission to include rehabilitation. In 1946, Helen Keller makes the first of many trips under the auspices of the Foundation to investigate the conditions and needs of blind people worldwide.[2] In the 1950s, the organization evolves from treating blind people to working to prevent blindness.[4] In the late 1960s the focus again broadens, this time toward blindness prevention and treatment.[3] The Spirit of Helen Keller Award is established in 1959.
1977 onwards Helen Keller International In order to recognize the contributions of Helen Keller, AFOB adopts the name of Helen Keller International.[2] In the 1970s, HKI pioneers Vitamin A supplementation, which is successfully distributed to millions of children in developing countries, drastically reducing the number of cases of childhood blindness.[5][3] In the 1970s, HKI conducts operations in Asia including Philippines and Bangladesh. In the 1980s HKI starts operations in several countries in Africa. Also in this decade, the organization develops a homestead gardening (HG) program to increase fruits and vegetables consumption after a blindness survey reveals that households with gardens are less likely to have children with night blindness.[6] In the 1990s and 2000s, HKI keeps expanding its operations into new countries. The Helen Keller Visionary Award is established in 2005. The Helen Keller Humanitarian Award is established in 2007. In the 2010s, over 200 million vitamin A capsules are provided by HKI to children in Africa. As of 2019, the organization spans 22 countries around the world.[1] Today it is widely praised for its Vitamin A supplementation program, and is regarded as a top charity by evaluators.

Full timeline

Year Event type Details Location
1880 Helen Keller biography Helen Keller is born on June 27 in Tuscumbia, Alabama.[7] United States
1882 Helen Keller biography At the age of 19 months, Helen Keller is afflicted with an illness (possibly scarlet fever) that leaves her blind and deaf.[7] United States
1887 (March) Helen Keller biography Anne Sullivan begins working with Helen Keller at the Keller's house.[8] United States
1903 Helen Keller biography Helen Keller publishes her first book, an autobiography called The Story of My Life.[9] United States
1904 Helen Keller biography Helen Keller graduates cum laude from Radcliffe College, becoming the first deafblind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree.[9] United States
1913 Helen Keller biography Helen Keller begins lecturing (with the aid of an interpreter), primarily on behalf of the American Foundation for the Blind.[7] United States
1915 Early organization American merchant and RMS Lusitania survivor George Kessler and his wife, Cora Parsons Kessler, organize in Paris the British, French, and Belgian Permanent Relief War Fund. As a survivor, and vowing to help veterans in some way, George Kessler eventually settles on helping those blinded in the war. He then recruits author and lecturer Helen Keller.[3][1] France
1919 Early organization George Kessler, Cora Parsons Kessler, and Helen Keller form an American branch of the Permanent Relief War Fund called the Permanent Blind Relief War Fund for Soldiers and Sailors of the Allies, which is incorporated in New York City, with Keller and Cora Parsons Kessler as trustees.[3] United States
1920 Early organization Helen Keller cofounds the American Civil Liberties Union with American civil rights activist Roger Nash Baldwin and others.[7] United States
1920 Leadership George Kessler dies and is succeeded by New York lawyer William Nelson Cromwell, co-founder of Sullivan & Cromwell, an international law firm headquartered in New York City.[10] United States
1924 Helen Keller biography Helen Keller joins the American Foundation for the Blind. She would serve as a spokesperson and ambassador for the foundation until her death.[9] United States
1925 Assistance The Permanent Relief War Fund begins serving blind civilians, as well as military personnel, and also begins printing texts in Braille, a writing system for the blind that uses raised dots. This prompts the name change to the American Braille Press for War and Civilian Blind.[3][10] United States
1937 Publication The American Braille Press for War and Civilian Blind publishes the first “talking book”, becoming one of the leading publishers of Braille texts.[3][10] United States
1937 Program launch The American Braille Press for War and Civilian Blind makes plans to aid soldiers who would inevitably be blinded in World War II.[10]
1939 Background World War II begins in Europe.[10] Europe
1946 Helen Keller biography On behalf of the American Foundation for Overseas Blind, Helen Keller begins touring internationally, expanding her advocacy for people with vision impairment. In 11 years, she would visit 35 countries on five continents.[9]
1946 Renaming The American Braille Press for War and Civilian Blind changes its name to the American Foundation for the Overseas Blind, as its mission expands to include rehabilitation of the blind.[3]
1946 Research/program Helen Keller makes the first of many trips under the auspices of the Foundation to investigate the conditions and needs of blind people in all parts of the world.[10]
1949 Conference Spearheaded by the American Foundation for the Overseas Blind, an International Conference of Workers for the Blind, attended by representatives of the United Nations and UNESCO is held. Resolutions are passed, stressing the need to give blind people the physical, psychological and technical means to take their place in society, with a particular emphasis on education.[10]
1959 Program launch The American Foundation for the Overseas Blind initiates the Helen Keller Crusade for the Blind, named to honor the leadership and inspiration she has given for many years. The purpose of the Crusade is to expand public awareness of and support of the Foundation’s programs.[10]
1959 Recognition by HKI The Spirit of Helen Keller Award is established, commemorating her legacy and expressing appreciation for her role as a founder, trustee and staff member of Helen Keller International.[10]
1960 Recognition by HKI Edwin Baker, founder of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11]
1965 Helen Keller biography Helen Keller is elected to the National Women’s Hall of Fame and is named by Gallup (the poll people) as one of the Most Widely Admired People of the 20th Century.[12] United States
1966 Conference The First African Conference on Work for the Blind is held, prompting discussions about taking steps to prevent blindness while continuing to help those already afflicted.[10]
1968 Recognition by HKI George L. Raverat, director of the European Office of the American Foundation for Overseas Blind, receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11]
1968 Helen Keller biography Helen Keller dies at her home in Connecticut.[9] United States
1970 Recognition by HKI British public health advocate John Wilson receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11]
1971 Policy HKI starts moving into the area of prevention, and becomes involved in the prevention and treatment of widespread vitamin A deficiency leading to xerophthalmia and keratomalacia.[13]
1973 Recognition by HKI James S. Adams, president of Research to Prevent Blindness, receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11]
1975 Assistance HKI starts working in the Philippines.[14] Philippines
1976 Recognition by HKI John Ferre, United States Director of the National Society for the Prevention of Blindness, receives posthumously the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11]
1976 Publication HKI publishes Xerophthalmia, a paper delivered to HKI's Board of Trustees by the WHO Medical Officer in charge of Nutrition Research.[13]
1977 Renaming The American Foundation for the Overseas Blind adopts the name Helen Keller International to honour Keller’s contributions to the organization and to the blind and disadvantaged.[3]
1977 Recognition by HKI UNICEF executive director Henry Richardson Labouisse Jr. receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11]
1978 Publication The World Health Organization, in collaboration with HKI, publishes the Field Guide to the Detection and Treatment of Xerophthalmia.[13]
1978 Recognition by HKI Eric T. Boulter, Director-General of the UK Royal National Institute for the Blind receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11]
1978 Assistance HKI starts working in Bangladesh.[15] Bangladesh
1979 Recognition by HKI The International Association of Lions Clubs receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11]
1980 Recognition to HK The Helen Keller Day is innaugurated on June 27 as a commemorative holiday to celebrate the birth of Helen Keller. The holiday observance is created by presidential proclamation.[12] United States
1980 Recognition by HKI The United States Agency for International Development receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11] United States
1980 Assistance HKI initiates efforts aimed at integrating primary eye care into primary health care.[13]
1980 Assistance HKI supports six country programs with a budget of around US$1 million.[16]
1982 Publication HKI and WHO collaboratively publish the Technical Report Series No. 72, Control of Vitamin A Deficiency and Xerophthalmia.[13]
1983 Recognition by HKI Japanese businessman Ryoichi Sasakawa receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11]
1984 International expansion HKI establishes an office in Tanzania.[17] Tanzania
1986 Assistance HKI starts its programs in Burkina Faso.[18] Burkina Faso
1987 Recognition by HKI Indian ophthalmologist Govindappa Venkataswamy receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11]
1988 Recognition by HKI Dr. Christy (famous along with his wife, Dorothy, for their dedicated service to the cataract poor of Taxila, Pakistan receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11]
1988 Program launch HKI conducts a pilot Home Gardening project among 1,000 households in Bangladesh. Later in the early 1990s, based on the results and experience gained from this pilot project, HKI would start the NGO Gardening and Nutrition Education Surveillance Project (NGNESP).[19] Bangladesh
1988 Publication HKI, in collaboration with World Food Programme and Institute of Nutrition and Food Science, compiles and publishes the first English version of a Food Composition Table (FCT) for Bangladesh named Tables of Nutrient Composition of Bangladeshi Foods, which includes old and new data from Bangladesh and some borrowed data from the Indian Food Composition Tables.[20] Bangladesh
1988 Assistance HKI starts operating in Nepal.[21] Nepal
1989 Recognition by HKI Merck & Co. and Dr. Susan T. Pettiss (Director of Vitamin A Program of Helen Keller International) receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11]
1990 Program launch HKI launches the Nutrition Surveillance Project (NSP) to monitor the health impact of severe flooding in Bangladesh. It is a collaborative effort which involves the Government of Bangladesh (GOB), international and local Non-Governmental Organisations (NGO).[22][23] Bangladesh
1991 Recognition by HKI Dr. Francisco Contreras (Director General of the Instituto Nacional de Oftalmología, Perú), Dr. Newton Kara Jose (Director of University of Campinas, Brazil), Hoffmann-La Roche Task Force, and the humanitarian nutrition think tank Sight and Life receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11]
1992 (February) Study HKI convenes a meeting of concerned scientists, health officials, and policy makers to examine the role of vitamin A status on the health of children in developing countries.[24]
1992 Assistance HKI begins its activities in Cameroon with the fight against river blindness in Monatélé, Centre region.[25] Cameroon
1993 Program launch Following the initial success of the Homstead Food Production program as a pilot project in Bangladesh with 1000 households participating, HKI launches the NGO Gardening and Nutrition Education Surveillance Project (NGNESP) which expands the program to communities across the country.[26]
1993 Assistance HKI starts collaborating with the Royal Government of Cambodia, UNICEF, and the World Health Organization in order to combat vitamin A deficiency through the distribution of vitamin A capsules (VAC).[27] Cambodia
1994 Recognition by HKI Indonesian President Suharto, American diplomat J. Brian Atwood (Administrator of USAID), United States Congressman Tony P. Hall, and Donald H. Hubbs, (Chairman of The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation) receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11]
1998 Recognition by HKI Jansen Noyes III receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11]
1999 International expansion HKI opens an operating office in Burkina Faso.[18] Burkina Faso
1999 Recognition by HKI Japanese writer Ayako Sono and South African activist Desmond Tutu receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11]
1999 Assistance HKI starts supporting the Mali government’s efforts in the fight against malnutrition by implementing a wide range of activities including: Vitamin A supplementation, food fortification, essential nutrition actions and community-based management of acute malnutrition (CMAM).[28] Mali
2000 Assistance HKI begins operating in Côte d'Ivoire.[29] Côte d'Ivoire
2000 Recognition by HKI King Mohammed VI of Morocco, Gale Bensussen (president of Leiner Health Products), and John S. Crowley (Chairman Emeritus of Helen Keller Worldwide) receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11]
2000 Assistance HKI starts its programs in Guinea in 2000 with an initial focus on nutrition.[30] Guinea
2001 Terrorist attack HKI offices in New York City are destroyed during the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center. No employees were injured, although Helen Keller’s archives are lost.[10] United States
2002 International expansion HKI establishes regional office for Africa in Dakar, Senegal.[31] Senegal
2002 Assistance HKI begins working in Sierra Leone.[32] Sierra Leone
2003 Assistance Indonesia’s Ministry of Education invites HKI to assist children with disabilities, especially those who are poor and in vulnerable situations.[33] Indonesia
2003 Assistance HKI enables the distribution of Mectizan to over 2.5 million people across Africa.[34] Africa
2003 Assistance HKI provides 34,000 free pairs of eyeglasses to students in the state of Oaxaca, Mexico.[34] Mexico
2004 Assistance Following the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami, HKI distributes multi-micronutrient Sprinkles as part of the large-scale relief efforts.[10]
2004 Partnership HKI partners with the Standard Chartered Bank (SCB) to provide eye glasses, support cataract surgeries, and distribute Vitamin A capsules in Indonesia.[35] Indonesia
2005 Recognition by HKI The Helen Keller Visionary Award is established to recognize institutional friends "whose generosity and innovations advance" HKI mission.[10] The Helen Keller Legacy Award is established to recognize the significant on-going support of an institution for the work of Helen Keller International.[11]
2006 Recognition by HKI International law firm Sullivan & Cromwell receives the Helen Keller Legacy Award.[11] American ophthalmologist Alfred Sommer from Johns Hopkins University receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11] The H. J. Heinz Company and William R. Johnson, chairman, president and CEO of the former, receive the Helen Keller Visionary Award.[11]
2007 Recognition by HKI The Helen Keller Humanitarian Award is established "to recognize the significant support of individuals or institutions for their sustained humanitarian efforts around the world."[10]
2007 Recognition by HKI Daniel G. Sisler, Ph.D, Retiring Chair of HKI Board of Trustees, receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11] American global pharmaceutical company Allergan, Inc. and David E.I. Pyott, CBE, chairman of the board, and CEO of the former receive the Helen Keller Legacy Award.[11]
2008 Recognition by HKI Gordon and Llura Gund, co-founders of the Foundation Fighting Blindness, receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11] Merck & Co. and its President & CEO Richard T. Clark, become the first recipients of The Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.[10][11]
2009 (September) Recognition to HKI HKI receives the 2009 Champalimaud Award for its blindness prevention work in developing countries.[36][10]
2009 Recognition to HKI Consumers Digest lists HKI as one of America’s Top Charities. This distinction is awarded because its cost-effective fundraising.[10]
2009 Recognition by HKI American social entrepreneur David Green receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11] Johnson & Johnson and Brian D. Perkins, Corporate Vice President of Corporate Affairs, receives the Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.[11] Christie’s Inc. and Christopher Burge, chairman of the former, receive the Helen Keller Legacy Award.[11]
2010 Recognition by HKI Perkins School for the Blind in Watertown, Massachusetts receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11] The Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) receives the Helen Keller Visionary Award.[11]
2011 Recognition HKI is included in Pulitzer prize-winning New York Times columnist, Nicholas Kristof’s "Gifts That Say You Care" holiday giving column. “Helen Keller International...gets more bang for the buck than almost any group I can think of.”[10]
2011 Recognition by HKI Reader’s Digest, Partners for Sight Foundation receives the Helen Keller Legacy Award.[11] French retailer L'Occitane en Provence receives the Helen Keller Visionary Award.[11]
2012 Recognition by HKI American epidemiologist William Foege receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11]
2013 Recognition by HKI United States Secretary of State Hillary Clinton receives the Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.[11] HKI Board member Kate Ganz receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11] Barry Palmer, vice president of Lions Club International, receives the Helen Keller Visionary Award.[11]
2013–2015 Assistance HKI provides over 200 million vitamin A capsules to children 6-59 months of age in 13 African countries during this period.[37] Africa
2014 Recognition by HKI Irish economist and humanitarian Tom Arnold receives the Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.[11]
2014 Recognition HKI becomes the tenth recipient of the Henry R. Kravis Prize in Leadership in recognition of its worldwide fight against blindness and malnutrition. The Award is accepted by Kathy Spahn, HKI's President & CEO.[10]
2014 Recognition Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunities featuring the work of HKI.[10]
2015 (February) Recognition to HKI HKI is selected to receive the 2015 BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award.[38]
2015 (May) Recognition by HKI Bill Gates and Melinda Gates receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11][39] Dr. David Nabarro, United Nations Secretary-General’s Special Envoy on Ebola, receives the Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.[11]
2016 Recognition by HKI Ban Ki-moon, Secretary-General of the United Nations receives the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11] Desmond Fitzgerald, founder of Hope for Poor Children Foundation, receives the Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.[11][40]
2016 (October) Assistance HKI and Christian development organization Effect:Hope start supporting Vitamin A Supplementation and deworming programs in the Kilifi, Kwale and Siaya counties in Kenya.[41]
2017 (May) Recognition by HKI Jim Alling, CEO of global giving company TOMS, receives the Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.[42][11]
2017 (November 27) Recognition American charity evaluator GiveWell ranks HKI's vitamin A supplementation (VAS) program among its top charities for giving season 2017.[43]
2018 (March) Recognition by HKI Yetnebersh Nigussie, Disability rights activist and inclusion advisor at Light for the World receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[44][11]
2018 (March) Assistance HKI assists poor families in Vietnam prevent malnutrition by growing healthy food on small homestead farms. The organization also trains community nutrition volunteers to educate families and caregivers about what to feed infants and young children to ensure they get the nutrients they need for healthy development.[45] Vietnam
2018 (April) Partnership/contribution HKI works in partnership with the Ministry of Health in Ivory Coast to provide children with Vitamin A supplements twice a year as part of the country’s regular health campaigns.[45] Ivory Coast
2018 (May) Assistance HKI launches emergency programs in Niger to improve sanitation and hygiene and prevent cholera outbreaks. The organization also distributed hygiene kits to vulnerable families.[45] Niger
2018 (July) Assistance HKI works with partners in Mozambique’s Tete Province to prevent malnutrition among children under the age of five—and to improve the status of women in the poorest rural communities—through agriculture.[45] Mozambique
2018 (September) Assistance HKI supports the Government of Cameroon to deliver mass distributions of invectin to prevent and treat onchocerciasis among at-risk populations. The organization completes a mass drug distribution campaign in Bafang District.[45] Cameroon
2018 (October) Assistance HKI trains teams of community health workers in Tanzania with the purpose to bring health services right to people’s doorsteps on home visits to improve nutrition among vulnerable mothers and young children in the Mtwara Region.[45] Tanzania
2018 (November) Assistance HKI assists rural communities in Cambodia to improve nutrition and increase their income through polyculture fish farming. Fish farmers are trained to raise several species of fish together in their ponds, with the purpose to increase their profits and help support the ecosystem.[45] Cambodia
2018 Recognition by HKI Bradford Perkins, founder, chairman and CEO of Perkins Eastman Architects, receives the Helen Keller Humanitarian Award.[11]
2018 (December 12) Recognition GiveWell recommends that US$6.5 million (about 10% of Good Ventures US$64 million grant for the year) be allocated to HKI’s vitamin A supplementation program.[46]
2018 (December) Assistance HKI creates training groups of women farmers in Bangladesh with the purpose to increase harvests, improve profits marketing, generate more revenue for their families, and set up savings groups.[45] Bangladesh
2019 Recognition by HKI Dr. Andrew S. Fisher and The Lavelle Fund for the Blind receive the Spirit of Helen Keller Award.[11]

Meta information on the timeline

How the timeline was built

The initial version of the timeline was written by User:Sebastian.

Funding information for this timeline is available.

Feedback and comments

Feedback for the timeline can be provided at the following places:

  • FIXME

What the timeline is still missing

Timeline update strategy

See also

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 "Helen Keller International (HKI)". devex.com. Retrieved 4 September 2019. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 "Our History". hki.org. Retrieved 10 November 2019. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 "Helen Keller International". britannica.com. Retrieved 4 September 2019. 
  4. "Helen Keller International Wins BBVA Award". hki.org. Retrieved 31 October 2019. 
  5. "HKI Named a Top Charity by GiveWell". hki.org. Retrieved 31 October 2019. 
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