Difference between revisions of "Timeline of malnutrition"

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| 1921 || || || "The first fast-food hamburger chain, White Castle, was founded in Wichita, Kansas".<ref name="Timeline: History of the Fast Food Epidemic">{{cite web |title=Timeline: History of the Fast Food Epidemic |url=https://blogs.uoregon.edu/charligf13gateway/timeline/ |website=blogs.uoregon.edu |accessdate=9 December 2019}}</ref>
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| 1955 || || || "Ray Kroc founded the first McDonald’s in Des Plaines, Illinois and would go on to become the most influential fast-food pioneer in history. By 1958, Kroc had sold his 100 millionth hamburger."<ref name="Timeline: History of the Fast Food Epidemic"/>
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| 1967 || || || "High fructose corn syrup was first introduced by The Food and Drug Administration and appeared in fast food. This new substance was primarily used in soft drinks and to sweeten processed food items."<ref name="Timeline: History of the Fast Food Epidemic"/>
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| 1969 || || || "A White House Conference on Food, Nutrition, and Health was organized by President Richard Nixon to draw attention to widespread malnutrition and the nutritional problems of Americans. The conference goal was to compose a national nutrition policy and determine how to make it effective."<ref name="Timeline: History of the Fast Food Epidemic"/>
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| 1973 || || || "The Food and Drug Administration created the first regulations that required the nutrition labeling of foods. These regulations made any foods that were advertised or labeled based on their nutritional value to provide full nutrition facts."<ref name="Timeline: History of the Fast Food Epidemic"/>
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| 1989 || || || "Wendy’s first introduced their $0.99 Super Value Menu, which consisted of several popular items for a bargain. "<ref name="Timeline: History of the Fast Food Epidemic"/>
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|-
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| 2002 || || || "A group of overweight children sued the McDonald’s Corporation for obesity related health problems because of their consumption of McDonald’s products. The children wanted more accessible nutritional labeling of products and appropriate funding for programs to educate consumers about the risks of fast food. "<ref name="Timeline: History of the Fast Food Epidemic"/>
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|-
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| 2004 || || || " Morgan Spurlock’s controversial documentary Super Size Me debuted. Spurlock ate a diet consisting of only McDonald’s for 30 days as he explored the fast food industry and major health risks. McDonald’s later took their “Super Size” option off their menu because of the repercussions from the film."<ref name="Timeline: History of the Fast Food Epidemic"/>
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|-
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| 2006 || || || "Wendy’s enhanced the size and names of their drinks to keep up with the demand for soda from their consumers. They changed the name of their 32-ounce soda “biggie” to medium, added large 42-ounce soda, changed medium French fries to small, “biggie” to medium, and “great biggie” to large."<ref name="Timeline: History of the Fast Food Epidemic"/>
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| 2013 || || || "Wendy’s enhanced the size and names of their drinks to keep up with the demand for soda from their consumers. They changed the name of their 32-ounce soda “biggie” to medium, added large 42-ounce soda, changed medium French fries to small, “biggie” to medium, and “great biggie” to large."<ref name="Timeline: History of the Fast Food Epidemic"/>
 
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Revision as of 11:59, 9 December 2019

This is a timeline of FIXME.

Big picture

Time period Development summary More details

Full timeline

Year Month and date Event type Details
1921 "The first fast-food hamburger chain, White Castle, was founded in Wichita, Kansas".[1]
1955 "Ray Kroc founded the first McDonald’s in Des Plaines, Illinois and would go on to become the most influential fast-food pioneer in history. By 1958, Kroc had sold his 100 millionth hamburger."[1]
1967 "High fructose corn syrup was first introduced by The Food and Drug Administration and appeared in fast food. This new substance was primarily used in soft drinks and to sweeten processed food items."[1]
1969 "A White House Conference on Food, Nutrition, and Health was organized by President Richard Nixon to draw attention to widespread malnutrition and the nutritional problems of Americans. The conference goal was to compose a national nutrition policy and determine how to make it effective."[1]
1973 "The Food and Drug Administration created the first regulations that required the nutrition labeling of foods. These regulations made any foods that were advertised or labeled based on their nutritional value to provide full nutrition facts."[1]
1989 "Wendy’s first introduced their $0.99 Super Value Menu, which consisted of several popular items for a bargain. "[1]
2002 "A group of overweight children sued the McDonald’s Corporation for obesity related health problems because of their consumption of McDonald’s products. The children wanted more accessible nutritional labeling of products and appropriate funding for programs to educate consumers about the risks of fast food. "[1]
2004 " Morgan Spurlock’s controversial documentary Super Size Me debuted. Spurlock ate a diet consisting of only McDonald’s for 30 days as he explored the fast food industry and major health risks. McDonald’s later took their “Super Size” option off their menu because of the repercussions from the film."[1]
2006 "Wendy’s enhanced the size and names of their drinks to keep up with the demand for soda from their consumers. They changed the name of their 32-ounce soda “biggie” to medium, added large 42-ounce soda, changed medium French fries to small, “biggie” to medium, and “great biggie” to large."[1]
2013 "Wendy’s enhanced the size and names of their drinks to keep up with the demand for soda from their consumers. They changed the name of their 32-ounce soda “biggie” to medium, added large 42-ounce soda, changed medium French fries to small, “biggie” to medium, and “great biggie” to large."[1]

Meta information on the timeline

How the timeline was built

The initial version of the timeline was written by FIXME.

Funding information for this timeline is available.

Feedback and comments

Feedback for the timeline can be provided at the following places:

  • FIXME

What the timeline is still missing

Timeline update strategy

See also

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 "Timeline: History of the Fast Food Epidemic". blogs.uoregon.edu. Retrieved 9 December 2019.