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Timeline of recycling

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| 2002 || {{w|Textile recycling}} || || {{w|Carpet America Recovery Effort}}<ref>{{cite web |title=Carpet America Recovery Effort (CARE) |url=https://www.recyclingproductnews.com/company/5490/carpet-america-recovery-effort-care |website=recyclingproductnews.com |accessdate=14 February 2020}}</ref><ref>{{cite web |title=CARE 2012 Annual Report |url=https://carpetrecovery.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Carpet-America-Recovery-Effort-2012-Annual-Report.pdf |website=carpetrecovery.org |accessdate=14 February 2020}}</ref> || {{w|United States}}
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| 2002 || || Policy || "But in 2002, {{w|New York City}}, an early municipal recycling pioneer, found that its much-lauded recycling program was losing money, so it eliminated eliminates glass and plastic recycling. According to Mayor Michael Bloomberg, after finding that the benefits of recycling plastic and glass were are outweighed by the price—recycling cost twice as much as disposal. Meanwhile, low demand for the materials meant that much of it was ending up in landfills anyway, despite best intentions."<ref name="The Pros and Cons of Recycling"/> || {{w|United States}}
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| 2003 || Electronics || Policy || The {{w|Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive}} (WEEE) is passed into {{w|European Law}}. It sets collection, recycling and recovery targets for all types of electrical goods. ||
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| 2006 || || || {{w|World Reuse, Repair and Recycling Association}}<ref>{{cite web |title=World Reuse, Repair and Recycling Association |url=https://www.morebooks.de/store/gb/book/world-reuse,-repair-and-recycling-association/isbn/978-613-3-66974-1 |website=morebooks.de |accessdate=14 February 2020}}</ref><ref>{{cite web |title=Frequently Asked Questions about Fair Trade Recycling |url=http://ingenthron.net/mission/faq.html |website=ingenthron.net/ |accessdate=14 February 2020}}</ref> ||
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| 2006 || || Organization || {{w|I-recycle}} || {{w|United Kingdom}}
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| 2007 || Electronics || Policy || Five U.S. states pass laws requiring that unwanted electronics be recycled.<ref name="A Brief Timeline of the History of Recycling"/> || {{w|United States}}
| 2007 || {{w|Plastic recycling}} || Organization || Non-governmental organization {{w|Trashy Bags}} is founded in Ghana with the purpose to "contribute to cleaning up the streets of {{w|Accra}}". It turns plastic waste into reusable shopping bags, fashion accessories, school supplies, and other products.<ref>{{cite web |title=Trashy Bags |url=http://trashybags.org/ |website=trashybags.org |accessdate=13 February 2020}}</ref><ref>{{cite web |title=Ghana’s pure water irony: Trashy bags it’s solution? |url=https://www.modernghana.com/news/188133/ghanas-pure-water-irony-trashy-bags-its-solutio.html |website=modernghana.com |accessdate=13 February 2020}}</ref> || {{w|Ghana}}
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| 2007 || || || {{w|BuyMyTronics.com}}launches as an electronics resale business in {{w|Denver}}, {{w|Colorado}}.<ref>{{cite web |title=BuyMyTronics.com |url=https://www.crunchbase.com/organization/buymytronics |website=crunchbase.com |accessdate=13 February 2020}}</ref> || {{w|United States}}
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| 2008 || || || The {{w|USPS Post Office Box Lobby Recycling program}} launches in the United States as a project for consumers to recycle paper items, using recycling bins placed in the customer lobbies of post office buildings.<ref>{{cite web |title=USPS Post Office Box Lobby Recycling program |url=http://officeschoices.blogspot.com/2017/10/usps-post-office-box-lobby-recycling.html |website=officeschoices.blogspot.com/ |accessdate=17 February 2020}}</ref> || {{w|United States}}
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| 2009 || {{w|Scrap}} || Publication || American professor {{w|Carl A. Zimring}} publishes ''Cash for your trash'', one of the first specialized studies about scrap recycling in the United States.<ref>{{cite web|title=Zimring, Carl A. Cash for your trash : Scrap recycling in America|url=http://www.scielo.br/pdf/rbh/v33n66/en_a17v33n66.pdf|website=scielo.br|accessdate=16 August 2017}}</ref> || {{w|United States}}
| 2013 || || Program launch || Operation Green Fence launches in China as an effort to start getting exporting countries to clean their recycling, their plastics in particular.<ref name="America’s new recycling crisis, explained by an expert"/> || {{w|China}}
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| 2014 || Textile || Statistics || "More than 15 Over 16 million tons of used textile waste is are generated each year in the United States, and in the amount has doubled over the last 20 years. In 2014, over 16 million tons of textile waste was generated, according to the Environmental Protection Agencyyear. Of this amount, 2.62 million tons were are recycled, 3.14 million tons were are combusted for energy recovery, and 10.46 million tons were are sent to the landfill. An average American throws away approximately 80 pounds of used clothing per person per year. On average, nationally, it costs cities $45 per ton to dispose of old clothing. Synthetic clothing may take hundreds of years to decompose."<ref name="Textile and Garment Recycling Facts and Figures">{{cite web |title=Textile and Garment Recycling Facts and Figures |url=https://www.thebalancesmb.com/textile-recycling-facts-and-figures-2878122 |website=thebalancesmb.comd |accessdate=4 February 2020}}</ref> || {{w|United States}}
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| 2014 || || || About 258 million tons of trash are generated in the United States. 66.4 million tons are cecycled and 23 million tons of this material are composted. A 34.6 percent recycling rate is calculated. On average, Americans recycle and compost 1.51 pounds of their individual waste generation of 4.44 pounds per person per day.<ref name="lbre.stanford.edu">{{cite web |title=Frequently Asked Questions: Benefits of Recycling |url=https://lbre.stanford.edu/pssistanford-recycling/frequently-asked-questions/frequently-asked-questions-benefits-recycling |website=lbre.stanford.edu |accessdate=9 February 2020}}</ref> || {{w|United States}}
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| 2015 || {{w|Plastic recycling}} || || "Of the An estimated 9 percent out of a cumulative 5800 million tonnes tons of primary plastic no longer in use, only 9 percent has is estimated to have been recycled since 1950."<ref name="Plastic Pollution"/>|| {{w|Worldwide}}
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| 2015 || {{w|Plastic recycling}} || || In the year, an estimated 55 percent of global plastic waste is discarded, 25 percent is incinerated, and 20 percent recycled.<ref name="Plastic Pollution"/> ||
| 2019 || || || America Recycles Day becomes an integral part of the Keep America Beautiful Campaign.<ref name="America Recycles Dayd"/> || {{w|United States}}
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| 2030 || Plastic || || "{{w|Coca Cola }} intends to use 50% recycled Polyethylene {{w|polyethylene terephthalate }} in its containers by 2030this year."<ref name="thebalancesmb.com">{{cite web |title=Recycling Polyethylene Terephthalate |url=https://www.thebalancesmb.com/recycling-polyethylene-terephthalate-pet-2877869 |website=thebalancesmb.com |accessdate=4 February 2020}}</ref> ||
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