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| 1855 || || || || The {{w|Carriage of Passengers Act of 1855}} recognizes students as a category of temporary immigrant.<ref name=shareok>{{cite web|url = https://shareok.org/bitstream/handle/11244/917/3187222.PDF?sequence=1|title = A Descriptive Case Study of the Impact of 9/11 on International Student Visa Policy in the 20 Months Following the Attacks|author = Mary Helen Reeves|accessdate = February 10, 2016}}</ref>
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| 1882 || || || || The {{w|Chinese Exclusion Act}} of 1882 significantly restricts the immigration of Chinese sklled skilled and unskilled laborers, but carves out an exception for students.<ref name=shareok/>
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| 1913 || || || || The U.S. Bureau of Education records indicate that 4,222 international students were enrolled in 275 U.S. universities, colleges, and technical schools; most of them were sent by foreign governments for education and training that would be useful when the students returned home.<ref name=shareok/>
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| 2003 || January 31 || || || Mandatory SEVIS use begins on this date.<ref name=shareok/>
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| 2020 || {{dts|March 9}}, March 13 || Guidance || ICE SEVP || In two pieces of guidance published on March 9 and March 13, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement temporarily modifies the Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) in response to the {{w|COVID-19 pandemic in the United States}}. The guidance allows students in F-1 or M-1 status to retain student status while staying in the United States if their school is temporarily closed due to COVID-19, and to maintain status by enrolling in courses online if their school switches coursework to online, whether inside or outside the United States.<ref>{{cite web|url = https://www.ice.gov/sites/default/files/documents/Document/2020/Coronavirus%20Guidance_3.13.20.pdf|title = COVID-19: Guidance for SEVP Stakeholders|date = March 13, 2020|accessdate = July 20, 2020|publisher = U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement}}</ref> This temporary modification is extended through the spring and summer, but an announcement on July 6, 2020 partially repeals it for the autumn (fall) of 2020.
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| 2020 || {{dts|July 6}} || Guidance || ICE SEVP || The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement partially rolls back temporary modifications made to the Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) in March 2020 in response to the {{w|COVID-19 pandemic in the United States}}, with the rolled back version applicable starting with the autumn (fall). With the modified guidance, international students in F-1 or M-1 status must be enrolled in at least one in-person course in order to continue to stay in the United States; however, if their school is offering a hybrid of in-person and online coursework, they can take some courses online and count those toward credit requirements.<ref>{{cite web|url = https://www.ice.gov/news/releases/sevp-modifies-temporary-exemptions-nonimmigrant-students-taking-online-courses-during|title = SEVP modifies temporary exemptions for nonimmigrant students taking online courses during fall 2020 semester|date = July 6, 2020|accessdate = July 20, 2020|publisher = U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement}}</ref> Multiple lawsuits are filed by universities against ICE for this rollback.<ref>{{cite web|url = https://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2020/07/13/more-lawsuits-challenge-ice-international-student-rule|title = More Lawsuits Challenge ICE International Student Rule|last = Redden|first = Elizabeth|date = July 13, 2020|accessdate = July 20, 2020|publisher = Inside Higher Ed}}</ref>
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