Timeline of Ludwig von Mises Institute

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This is a timeline of Ludwig von Mises Institute.

Big picture

Time period Development summary More details
1982–1995 Rothbard era?
1995–present Online presence forms

Full timeline

Year Month and date Event type Details
1981 December Ludwig von Mises's widow Margit gives her approval to found the Mises Institute.[1]
1982 October Physical location The Mises Institute is founded by Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr. (founding president), with Murray Rothbard as the founding vice president.[2][3][4] The institute is originally housed "in a basement room" of Auburn University but would later move to "a shed behind the football stadium".[4]
1983 Periodical The journal The Free Market launches.[5]
1986 Recurring event The first Mises University, a summer school for North American students, takes place.[3]
1987 Periodical The first issue of The Review of Austrian Economics is published.[6]
1989 Physical location The institute moves to the Auburn University business school.[4]
1993 People Margit von Mises, Ludwig von Mises's widow, dies.[1]
1995 January 7 People Murray Rothbard, head of academic programs at the Mises Institute, dies.[1]
1995 October 2 Online presence The Mises Institute domain name, mises.org, is registered on this day.[7] The website goes online sometime during the same year.[3]
1996 Physical location The institute moves to its "own place near the School of Business".[4]
1998 Physical location The Mises Institute builds a campus in Auburn, Alabama.[3] (The institute was previously also in Auburn.)
1998 Periodical The Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics is established. It is a continuation of The Review of Austrian Economics.[8]
1999 July 15 Online presence The Mises Institute Yahoo Group, called the Mises Scholars List, is founded. The mailing list describes itself as "a low-traffic list for news, inquiries, and limited discussion on Austrian economics".[9] (The group seems to no longer be in use.)
2000 September 15 Outside review In its summer issue of the Intelligence Report, the Southern Poverty Law Center includes the Mises Institute in its list of neo-Confederate organizations.[10]
2000 October 10 Periodical The Mises Institute announces that Journal of Libertarian Studies has moved from the Center for Libertarian Studies to the Mises Institute.[11][12]
2000–2001 Physical location The Mises Institute building is extended "to accommodate the need for more library and faculty space".[1]
2002 July 29 – August 2 Recurring event Probably the first Rothbard Graduate Seminar takes place.[13]
2003 August 14 Outside review In its summer issue of the Intelligence Report, the Southern Poverty Law Center includes the Mises Institute in its list of "right-wing foundations and think tanks" that "support efforts to make bigoted and discredited ideas respectable". The SPLC argues that the Mises Institute "promotes a type of Darwinian view of society in which elites are seen as natural and any intervention by the government on behalf of social justice is destructive".[14]
2006 February 22 Online presence The Mises Institute YouTube account, misesmedia, is created.[15]
2008 January 28 Online presence The Mises Institute Twitter account, mises, is created on this day.[16]
2008 Fall People Lew Rockwell and Burt Blumert ask Douglas French to work at the Mises Institute.[17]
2009 People Douglas French becomes President of the institute.[18]
2010 April Online presence Mises Academy, a series of online classes and seminars created by the Mises Institute, launches.[3][19]
2010 August 18 Online presence The Mises Wire Twitter account, MisesBlog, is created.[20]
2010 November 5 Online presence The Mises Wiki is created.[21][22]
2013 December 21 People The Mises Institute announces that Jeff Deist has joined as its new President.[23]
2014 January 25 Outside review The Mises Institute is covered in a New York Times article about Rand Paul. The article states "Some scholars affiliated with the Mises Institute have combined dark biblical prophecy with apocalyptic warnings that the nation is plunging toward economic collapse and cultural ruin. Others have championed the Confederacy."[24] Robert Wenzel responds on LewRockwell.com, criticizing the portrayal of the institute, but calls it "a great and important moment" that the New York Times is paying attention to the institute and Rockwell.[25]
2015 February 13 Periodical The Mises Institute journal The Free Market is renamed to The Austrian. The institute claims the renaming is due to the term "free market" being "diluted through overuse and misuse".[26]
2015 July 19–25 Recurring event Probably the first Virtual Mises University takes place.[27]

Meta information on the timeline

How the timeline was built

The initial version of the timeline was written by Issa Rice.

Issa likes to work locally and track changes with Git, so the revision history on this wiki only shows changes in bulk. To see more incremental changes, refer to the commit history.

Funding information for this timeline is available.

What the timeline is still missing

  • Mises Institute has a bunch of awards, but it's difficult to include these in a timeline
  • Mises Institute holds a lot of recurring events. Including all of these would be a lot of work, but only including the inaugural events makes it seem like they aren't doing much these days. Is there a sensible way to include some subset?
  • Mises Institute publishes and republished a lot of books and interviews and such. With 656 books listed, it is not sensible to include all these publications, but how should the publications be prioritized for inclusion in the timeline? It's pretty hard to just "look for the ones most talked about" since that requires going through each and searching it up.
    • this interview lists some work; start at "Relate to me what you think the Mises Institute's greatest successes have been".
  • There are a lot of scholars that have been associated with the institute. What is a sensible policy for inclusion? Both in terms of picking whom to include and what to include (first association? official positions? etc.). Mises Institute website's bios seem pretty limited so it's pretty hard to find info even for a single individual.
  • Mises Institute people take certain positions on things, and some of these positions are what they become notorious for. But positions are difficult to order chronologically (what is the actual event?).

Timeline update strategy

See also

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 "About the Mises Institute". Retrieved August 23, 2017. 
  2. "About Mises". Mises Institute. June 18, 2014. Retrieved August 22, 2017. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 "What Is the Mises Institute?". Mises Institute. June 18, 2014. Retrieved August 22, 2017. 
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 "Mises.org: Frequently Asked Questions". Retrieved August 23, 2017. 
  5. "The Austrian vol 1 no 1 2015_0.pdf" (PDF). Retrieved August 22, 2017. 
  6. "Mises Institute". Mises Wiki, the global repository of classical-liberal thought. Retrieved August 22, 2017. 
  7. "| ICANN WHOIS". Retrieved August 22, 2017. Creation Date: 1995-10-02T04:00:00Z 
  8. "Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics". Retrieved August 23, 2017. 
  9. "Yahoo! Groups : mises". Retrieved August 23, 2017. 
  10. "The Neo-Confederates". Southern Poverty Law Center. Retrieved August 23, 2017. 
  11. "The Journal of Libertarian Studies - Mises Wiki, the global repository of classical-liberal thought". Retrieved August 23, 2017. 
  12. "News from the Mises Institute". Retrieved August 23, 2017. 
  13. "Rothbard Graduate Seminar 2002". Mises Institute. June 4, 2014. Retrieved August 22, 2017.  Incrementing the year produces later seminars, but there seems to not be earlier seminars than the one in 2002.
  14. Chip Berlet (August 14, 2003). "Into the Mainstream". Southern Poverty Law Center. Retrieved August 23, 2017. 
  15. "misesmedia". YouTube. Retrieved August 22, 2017. 
  16. "Mises Institute (@mises)". Twitter. Retrieved August 22, 2017. 
  17. "An Interview with Doug French". Mises Institute. April 30, 2010. Retrieved August 23, 2017. 
  18. "Doug French - Mises Wiki, the global repository of classical-liberal thought". Retrieved August 23, 2017. 
  19. "Mises Academy - Mises Wiki, the global repository of classical-liberal thought". Retrieved August 22, 2017. 
  20. "Mises Wire (@MisesBlog)". Twitter. Retrieved August 22, 2017. 
  21. "Mises Wiki, the global repository of classical-liberal thought". Retrieved August 22, 2017. Sponsored by the Ludwig von Mises Institute and founded on 5 November 2010, the repository now has 1,990 articles. 
  22. "Difference between revisions of "Main Page" - Mises Wiki, the global repository of classical-liberal thought". Retrieved August 22, 2017. 
  23. "Jeff Deist Joins the Mises Institute as its New President". Mises Institute. December 21, 2013. Retrieved August 23, 2017. 
  24. Tanenhaus, Sam; Rutenberg, Jim (January 25, 2014). "Rand Paul's Mixed Inheritance". The New York Times. Retrieved August 24, 2017. 
  25. Robert Wenzel (January 28, 2014). "In Defense of the Mises Institute". LewRockwell.com. Retrieved August 24, 2017. 
  26. "The Free Market is now The Austrian". Mises Institute. February 13, 2015. Retrieved August 22, 2017. 
  27. "Virtual Mises University 2015". Mises Institute. July 7, 2015. Retrieved August 22, 2017.  I haven't been able to find any earlier years this event took place.