Timeline of SpaceX

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The timeline currently offers focused coverage of the period until June 2020. It is likely to miss important developments outside this period (particularly after this period) though it may have a few events from after this period.

This is a timeline of SpaceX, which attempts to describe important events in the history of the company.

Sample questions

The following are some interesting questions that can be answered by reading this timeline:

  • What are some notable events in the history of spaceflight preluding the creation of SpaceX?
    • Sort the full timeline by "Event type" and look for the group of rows with value "Prelude".
    • You will see mostly events related to private spaceflight, as well as other historical significant events.
  • What are some significant events describing the life of SpaceX founder Elon Musk?
    • Sort the full timeline by "Event type" and look for the group of rows with value "Elon Musk biography".
    • You will see mostly events preluding the creation of SpaceX, with some mentioning other companies launched by Musk.
    • For some notable comments by Musk, sort the full timeline by "Event type" and look for the group of rows with value "Notable comment".
  • What are the several tests, mostly rocket launches, performed by SpaceX?
    • For failed tests, sort the full timeline by "Event type" and look for the group of rows with value "Failed test".
    • You will see events describing failed operations generally located earlier than successful attempts on the timeline, which indicates progress toward successful rocket launches.
    • For successful tests, sort the full timeline by "Event type" and look for the group of rows with value "Test".
  • What are the multiple missions conducted by SpaceX thoughout the years?
    • Sort the full timeline by "Event type" and look for the group of rows with value "Mission".
    • For communications satellite deliveries, sort the full timeline by "Event type" and look for the group of rows with value "Mission (communications satellite delivery)" or "Milestone mission (communications satellite delivery)".
    • For the multiple resupply missions toward the International Space Station, sort the full timeline by "Event type" and look for the group of rows with value "Mission (ISS resupply)".
    • For milestone missions, sort the full timeline by "Event type" and look for the group of rows with value "Milestone mission".
  • What are the several funding rounds SpaceX has had over the years, and how has the valuation of the company grown accordingly?
    • Sort the full timeline by "Event type" and look for the group of rows with value "Financial (funding)".
  • What rocket launch sites have been used by SpaceX?
  • What are the several booster landing locations used by SpaceX?
    • Look for the column entitled "Booster landing location (applicable for mission and test)".
    • You will read "No attempt" on applicable rows describing missions and tests for those with no attemt to land the booster.
  • What are some important contracts awarded to SpaceX by major organizations?
  • What are some notable events describing competition in commercial spaceflight?
    • Sort the full timeline by "Event type" and look for the group of rows with value "Competition".
    • You will see a number of private enterprises, and read names like Blue Origin and Virgin Galactic, among others.

Visual data

Wikipedia views

The image below shows Wikipedia views from December 2007 for desktop, and from July 2015 (see red vertical line) for mobile web, mobile app, desktop spider, and mobile web spider; to June 2020.[1]

SpaceX Wikipedia Views.jpg


The image below shows Wikipedia views for the articles Falcon 9, Dragon 2 and Starlink, in both linear[2] and logarithmic (base 10)[3] scale, from July 2015 to May 2020.

Falcon Dragon Starlink.jpg

Google trends

The image below shows Google Trends data from 2004 (the start of data availability) to June 2020 (when the screenshot was taken), indicating the evolution of interest in both SpaceX and Elon Musk. The image also shows the geographical distribuion of preferred interests.[4]

SpaceX Elon Google Trends.jpg

Big picture

Time period Development summary More details
2002–2007 Early period Early period of SpaceX, characterized by funding and testing.
2008–2019 Unmanned spaceflight period SpaceX achieves its first commercial spaceflight mission in 2008, starting a period of several dozens of missions serving agencies all over the world.
2020 onwards Human spaceflight period SpaceX begins its era of manned spaceflight after achieving its first crewed mission.

Summary by technology

Time period Development summary More details
2005 onwards Falcon development Falcon 1 development period, starting with the first failed launch in 2005, to actual recovery and reuse of Falcon rockets.
2010 onwards Dragon development SpaceX Dragon is introduced in 2010, and becomes the first commercially built and operated spacecraft to be recovered successfully from orbit.[5] SpaceX becomes the first private company to launch a payload into orbit and return it to Earth intact. Cape Canaveral becomes SpaceX's main launch site.
2011 onwards SpaceX reusable launch system development program SpaceX launches this program with the purpose to build an orbital launch system that may be reused many times in a manner similar to the reusability of aircraft.
2012 onwards Starship development Fully reusable super heavy-lift launch vehicle Starship begins development in 2012. In 2014, SpaceX begins construction on its own spaceport in South Texas, which would serve as launch site of the Starship rockets.[6]

Summary by year

Year Development summary
2005 SpaceX begins testing Falcon 1, its first real rocket design created with the goal of reusable space flight.[7]
2006 SpaceX wins its first NASA award for US$278 million to help develop Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon space capsule.[8]
2007 SpaceX moves to Hawthorne, California, to build a new rocket factory that could handle its larger Falcon 9 rockets.
2008 Falcon 1 becomes the first privately funded, liquid-fueled rocket to reach orbit.
2009 SpaceX becomes the first privately funded company to put a satellite in Earth orbit.[9]
2010 SpaceX becomes the first commercial company to successfully recover a spacecraft from Earth orbit with its Dragon spacecraft.[10]
2011 SpaceX begins the development of Falcon Heavy.[11]
2012 SpaceX becomes the first commercial company to dock with the International Space Station.[9]
2013 SpaceX becomes the first private company to send a satellite into geosynchronous orbit (SES-8).
2014 SpaceX reveals its Crew Dragon.[12]
2015 SpaceX becomes the first private company to send a probe beyond Earth orbit as well as the first to achieve landing of a first stage orbital capable rocket.
2016 SpaceX achieves the first water landing of a first stage orbital capable rocket (Falcon 9).
2017 SpaceX achieves one of its great ambitions, the recovery and reuse of rockets, conducting the historic first reflight of an orbital class rocket.[13]
2018 SpaceX begins launching Falcon Heavy, the world’s most powerful operational rocket by a factor of two.[13]
2019 SpaceX’s next-generation spacecraft, a Starship orbital prototype, begins initial tests with success.[14]
2020 SpaceX successfully achieves its first-ever crewed mission.

Full timeline

Year Month, date and time UTC Event type Details Rocket launch location (applicable for mission and test) Booster landing location (applicable for mission and test)
1958 July 29 Prelude The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is founded.[15]
1961 December 12 Prelude (private spaceflight) OSCAR 1 is launched as the first amateur radio satellite, aboard an American Thor-Agena rocket.[16][17][18]
1962 August 31 Prelude (private spaceflight) United States President John F. Kennedy signs the Communications Satellite Act of 1962, which provides the regulatory framework for private companies in the United States to own and operate their own satellites.[19][20]
1971 June 28 Elon Musk biography Elon Musk is born in Pretoria, South Africa.[21]
Elon Musk
1975 Prelude (private spaceflight) OTRAG from Germany becomes the first company to attempt private development and manufacture of space propulsion systems.[22]
1982 September 9 Prelude (private spaceflight) Conestoga 1 rocket by Space Services Inc. becomes the first privately funded rocket to reach space.[23][24][25]
1984 October 30 Prelude (private spaceflight) Commercial Space Launch Act of 1984[26][27][28]
1989 March 29 Prelude (private spaceflight) Starfire rocket, by Space Services Inc., launches carrying NASA experiments. This flight becomes the first federally licensed commercial launch in the United States.[29]
1989 Elon Musk biography Elon Musk moves to Canada and enrolls at Queen's University at Kingston, Ontario.[21]
1990 April 5 Prelude (private spaceflight) Orbital Sciences Corporation launches the Pegasus vehicle,[30] becoming the first private company to develop an orbital launch system.[31][32][33]
1991 Elon Musk biography Elon Musk is transferred to the University of Pennsylvania.[21]
1995 June 10 Prelude (private spaceflight) International Launch Services is formed as a private spaceflight partnership between Lockheed Martin (LM), Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center and Energia (corporation).[34]
1995 Elon Musk biography Elon Musk moves to California and co-founds (with his brother Kimbal) Zip2, a web software company.[21]
1999 Elon Musk biography Zip2 is acquired by Compaq for US$340 million.[21]
1999 November Elon Musk biography Elon Musk founds X.com, an online bank.[21]
2000 September 8 Prelude (private spaceflight) American internet entrepreneur Jeff Bezos founds Blue Origin as an aerospace manufacturer and sub-orbital spaceflight services company.[35][36]
2000 October Elon Musk biography Elon Musk is replaced by Peter Thiel as CEO of X.com, which would be renamed PayPal in 2001.[37]
2001 Elon Musk biography Elon Musk conceptualizes "Mars Oasis", a project to land a miniature experimental greenhouse containing seeds with dehydrated gel on Mars to grow plants on Martian soil, "so this would be the furthest that life's ever traveled"[38] in an attempt to regain public interest in space exploration and increase the budget of NASA.[39][40]
2001 Elon Musk biography Elon Musk travels to Moscow with aerospace supplies fixer Jim Cantrell, and Adeo Ressi (Musk's best friend from college), to buy refurbished ICBMs (Dnepr) that could send payloads into space.[41]
2002 May 6 SpaceX founding Elon Musk launches SpaceX[42], with original base established in El Segundo, California.[43] Musk founds the company paying US$100 million of its own company.[21]
2002 December Financial (funding) SpaceX raises US$12.1 million from Founders Fund in Series A funding round, reaching a valuation of US$18.8 million.[44]
2004 May 17 Competition A successful rocket launch to outer space is completed by the Civilian Space eXploration Team (CSXT), a team of around 30 civilians interested in private spaceflight. CSXT becomes the first amateur organization to send a rocket into space.[45][46]
2004 September 27 Competition Virgin Galactic is founded as a spaceflight company by British business magnate Richard Branson.[47]
2004 December 22 Background (policy) Unted States President George W. Bush signs the Commercial Space Launch Amendments Act, which provides a basic legal framework for commercial human spaceflight.[48]
2005 March Financial (funding) SpaceX raises US$22 million in Series B funding round, reaching a valuation of US$70.5 million.[44]
2005 November 25 Failed test The first Falcon 1 launch attempt at Omelek fails being scrubbed after a ground-supply liquid oxygen vent valve allows the small LOX supply to boil off.[49] Reagan Test Site, Omelek Island
2005 December 19 Failed test A second Falcon 1 launch attempt is scheduled for this date, but is delayed by high winds. Then, the first stage fuel tank buckles during fuel draining when the fuel pressurization system suffers a controller failure. The damaged first stage is shipped back to Los Angeles for repair. The second flight vehicle's first stage is shipped to Omelek in its place.[49] Reagan Test Site, Omelek Island
2006 January 18 Program launch NASA launches its Commercial Orbital Transportation Services to coordinate the delivery of crew and cargo to the International Space Station by private companies.[50]
2006 February 9 Failed test SpaceX tries launch again. A hot-fire test is completed at the Omelek pad with the new first stage, but a second stage propellant leak is discovered during the testing process, thwarting the attempt. The company ships the second stage to Los Angeles, replacing it with the second flight vehicle's second stage.[49] Reagan Test Site, Omelek Island
2006 March 24 (22:30:00) Failed test Falcon 1 fails in its inaugural launch attempt from Omelek Island in Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands, after liftoff. The two-stage rocket rises from its pad and ascends for about 25 seconds before an internal fire causes an engine shutdown, after which the vehicle rolls and falls toward the ocean.[49][51] Reagan Test Site, Omelek Island No attempt
2006 July 12 Competition Genesis I, an experimental inflatable space habitat developed and owned by Bigelow Aerospace, is successfully launched aboard Russian-Ukrainian Dnepr rocket. Genesis I becomes the first inflatable habitat module to reach orbit.[52]
2006 August 18 Contract SpaceX announces it has been selected by NASA to demonstrate delivery and return of cargo to the International Space Station as part of the agency's Commercial Orbital Transportation Services competition.[53]
2007 March 15 Test (Merlin) SpaceX performs a brief, successful static test ignition of the Falcon 1 first stage Merlin engine.[49]
2007 March 21 (01:10:00) Failed test Falcon 1 demo flight 2 is launched from Kwajalein site in Omelek Island, failing to reach orbit, and being the second Falcon 1 launch failure in two attempts.[49][51] Reagan Test Site, Omelek Island No attempt
2007 March Financial (funding) SpaceX raises US$31.5 million in Series C funding round, reaching a valuation of US$316.5 million.[44]
2007 Infrastructure SpaceX moves from its El Segundo, California headquarters into a new, huge facility in Hawthorne, with the purpose to build a new rocket factory that could handle its larger Falcon 9 rockets.[54]
2008 June 25 Test The third Falcon 1 rocket performs a Merlin 1C static test at Omelek.[49] Reagan Test Site, Omelek Island
2008 August 3 (03:34:00) Failed mission (Communications satellite delivery) The third SpaceX Falcon 1 rocket launches, failing shortly after lifting off. United States Air Force Trailblazer satellite, CubeSat nanosatellite PRESat and NASA's NanoSail-D are lost. This is the third Falcon 1 failure in three attempts.[49] Reagan Test Site, Omelek Island No attempt
2008 August Financial (funding) SpaceX raises US$20.4 million from Founders Fund, Threshold, and Rothenberg Ventures, in Series D, reaching a valuation of US$544.5 million.[44]
2008 September 28 (23:15:00) Milestone mission Falcon 1 Flight 4 is successfully conducted. SpaceX achieves the first privately funded liquid-fueled rocket to reach orbit. The rocket carries the 165 kg payload mass simulator Ratsat.[55][42][49] Reagan Test Site, Omelek Island No attempt
2008 December Contract NASA awards SpaceX Commercial Resupply Services (CRS) contract for US$1.6 billion.[56][57]
2008 December 30 Infrastructure The first Falcon 9 vehicle is integrated at Cape Canaveral.[58]
2009 March 10 Test (SpaceX Merlin) SpaceX announces successful testing of the Merlin Vacuum engine. A variant of the 1C engine, Merlin Vacuum features a larger exhaust section and a significantly larger expansion nozzle to maximize the engine's efficiency in the vacuum of space.[59] Merlin 1C Vacuum engine at Hawthorne factory in 2008
2009 June Financial (funding) SpaceX raises US$47.3 million from Scott Banister, DFJ Growth, Threshold, and Elon Musk in Series E funding round, reaching a valuation of US$796.4 million.[44]
2009 June Elon Musk biography Elon Musk joins Twitter, where he becomes a notable figure.[60][61]
2009 July 14 (03:36:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Falcon 1 Flight 5 becomes the first privately developed liquid fuel rocket to deliver a commercial satellite to Earth orbit. The rocket launches with RazakSat for Malaysia’s Astronautic Technology Sdn Bhd (ATSB).[57][42][51] Reagan Test Site, Omelek Island No attempt
2010 June 4 (18:45:00) Test Mission N° F9-01.[62] Falcon 9 innaugural test flight from Cape Canaveral is conducted. The Dragon Spacecraft Qualification Unit meets 100% of mission objectives on the first flight.[57][42][43] The company makes its inaugural test flight from Cape Canaveral, Florida.[43][51][63][64] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida No attempt
2010 October Financial (funding) SpaceX raises US$50.6 million from Founders Fund, DFJ Growth, Threshold, Valor Equity Partners, and Musket Research Associates, in Series F funding round, reaching a valuation of US$1 billion.[44]
2010 December 8 (15:43:00) Test Mission N° F9-02.[65] Falcon 9 Flight 2. SpaceX tests its Falcon 9 and a fully functioning Dragon capsule combination in a launch from Cape Canaveral. The test flight is the first under a NASA contract called COTS (Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. The rocket returns, with SpaceX becoming the first privately funded company to successfully launch, orbit, and recover a spacecraft.[55][57][42][43][66][43][67] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida No attempt
2011 December Contract Stratolaunch Systems announces that it would contract with SpaceX to develop an air-launched, multiple-stage launch vehicle, as a derivative of Falcon 9 technology, called the Falcon 9 Air.[68]
2011 Program launch SpaceX announces Grasshopper program to develop reusable rockets.[42]
2012 May 22 (07:44:38) Milestone mission (ISS resupply) Mission N° F9-03.[69] Dragon reaches the International Space Station. SpaceX becomes the first private company to send a spacecraft to the ISS (Falcon 9 Flight 3). The launch is the company's second demonstration test flight for NASA's Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) Program.[70][55][57][42][43][43][66][43] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida No attempt
2012 June Infrastructure SpaceX starts purchasing a number of real estate properties in Cameron County, Texas, where SpaceX South Texas Launch Site would be established.[71]
2012 October 8 (00:35:07) Mission (ISS resupply) Mission N° F9-04.[72] Falcon 9 launches Dragon on Commercial Resupply Services SpaceX CRS-1 mission to the International Space Station, bringing 1,000 lbs of food and cargo to the astronauts on board.[73][43][74] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida No attempt
2013 March 1 (15:10:13) Mission (ISS resupply) Mission N° F9-05.[75] The second SpaceX mission to the International Space Station under NASA's Commercial Resupply Services contract is launched from Cape Canaveral.[76] SpaceX CRS-2 becomes the fourth flight for SpaceX's uncrewed Dragon cargo spacecraft. Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida No attempt
2013 March Test SpaceX completes the first 24-storey test flight of a newly developed rocket, the Grasshopper. Meant to be a prototype for a reusable rocket into space, it safely returns to Earth, landing upright.[43]
2013 September 29 (16:00:13) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-06.[77] SpaceX successfully launches debut Falcon 9 v1.1, carrying an array of payloads including Canadian CASSIOPE technology demonstration satellite.[78] Vandenberg Air Force Base (LC-4, California Uncontrolled landing on the ocean
2013 December Contract NASA selects SpaceX to lease a historic launch pad for the company's commercial rockets. The agreement would allow the spaceflight company to lease the historic Pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center.[79][80][81][82][83][84]
2013 December 3 (22:41:00) Mission (Communications satellite delivery) SpaceX becomes the first private company to send a satellite into geosynchronous orbit when Falcon 9 v1.1 rocket launches the SES-8 commercial communications satellite into orbit from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The mission is SpaceX's first commercial satellite launch into a geostationary transfer orbit.[55][85] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida No attempt
2014 January 6 (22:06:00) Mission (Communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-08.[86] SpaceX Falcon 9 v1.1 launches carrying Thai commercial telecommunications satellite Thaicom 6 placing it into geosynchronous transfer orbit.[87] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida No attempt
2014 April 18 (19:25:22) Mission (ISS resupply) Mission N° F9-09.[88] SpaceX CRS-3 Commercial Resupply Service mission launches aboard Falcon 9 toward the International Space Station for resupply. Payload includes High Definition Earth Viewing cameras[89], the Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) device[90], and the Vegetable Production System, among other instruments.[91] The rocket first stage lands on barge in ocean, but is destroyed by heavy seas.[42] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Controlled landing on the ocean
2014 May–July Background (private spaceflight) NASA's International Cometary Explorer (ISEE-3), a defunct spacecraft, is successfully contacted and controlled by a private initiative known as the ISEE-3 Reboot Project. This is the first time a private group manages to command a spacecraft in deep space, though their plans to change the probe's orbit are abandoned weeks later when its thrusters fail to respond properly.[92][93]
2014 July 14 (15:15:00) Mission (Communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-10.[94] SpaceX conducts its Falcon 9 flight 10 mission, lofting a constellation of six ORBCOMM OG2 satellites to orbit.[95] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Controlled landing on the ocean
2014 August 4 Infrastructure The state of Texas and SpaceX announce agreement to build a spaceport at Boca Chica Beach, near Brownsville, Texas.[96]
2014 August 5 (08:00:00) Mission (Communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-11.[97] SpaceX launches Falcon 9 to deliver Hong Kong geostationary communications satellite AsiaSat 8 to Geostationary Transfer Orbit.[98] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida No attempt
2014 September 7 (05:00:00) Mission (Communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-13.[99] SpaceX launches Falcon 9 with AsiaSat 6 satellite to geosynchronous transfer orbit.[100][101] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida No attempt
Launch of Falcon 9 carrying ASIASAT 6 (16233828644).jpg
2014 September Contract NASA awards SpaceX a US$2.6 billion contract to fly American astronauts, and announces that SpaceX and Boeing will be the two companies developing spacecraft to send astronauts to the International Space Station. SpaceX’s crew capsule is called the Dragon V2.[57][43]
2014 September 21 (05:52:03) Mission (ISS resupply) Mission N° F9-12.[102] SpaceX Dragon C106 spacecraft is first launched aboard Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, carrying fourth cargo delivery flight (SpaceX CRS-4) to the International Space Station.[103] It would splash down in October, being successfully retrieved. Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Uncontrolled landing on the ocean
2014 September 22 Infrastructure SpaceX conducts a groundbreaking ceremony on the new South Texas Launch Site.[104]
2014 September 22 Notable comment Elon Musk indicates that "the first person to go to another planet could launch from the Boca Chica launch site" (SpaceX South Texas Launch Site)[105]
2014 October 23 Background (private spacecraft) The Manfred Memorial Moon Mission (4M) is launched by European space systems contractor LuxSpace. This is the first commercial payload sent to fly by the Moon.[106]
2015 January 10 (09:47:10) Mission (ISS resupply) Mission N° F9-14.[107] SpaceX CRS-5 Commercial Resupply Service mission launches aboard Falcon 9 v1.1, carrying a total of 577 kilograms of scientific hardware within the Dragon capsule, plus 494-kilogram Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) experiment flying in the unpressurised Trunk section of the spacecraft.[108] SpaceX begins a series of first stage landing attempts of its Falcon 9 rocket on an autonomous spaceport drone ship.[57] The rocket crashes and burns.[43] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Failed landing at original Just Read the Instructions (JRtI) autonomous spaceport drone ship
2015 January Financial (funding) SpaceX raises US$1 billion from a number of investors including Founders Fund, Google, and Fidelity Investments, in Series G funding round, reaching a valuation of US$10.1 billion.[44]
2015 February 11 Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-15.[109] SpaceX Falcon 9 successfully launches the Deep Space Climate Observatory DSCOVR spacecraft.[110] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Controlled landing in the ocean
2015 March 2 (03:50:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-16.[111] SpaceX Falcon 9 launches two communications satellites, the Eutelsat 115 West B and ABS-3A to Geostationary Transfer Orbit (GTO).[112] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida No attempt
2015 April 14 (20:10:41) Mission (ISS resupply) Mission N° F9-18.[113] SpaceX Falcon 9 lifts off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station carrying the Dragon resupply spacecraft on the sixth commercial resupply services mission (SpaceX CRS-6) to the International Space Station.[114] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Failed landing at original Just Read the Instructions (JRtI) autonomous spaceport drone ship
2015 April 27 (23:03:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-17. Falcon 9 launches Turkmenistan's first satellite (TürkmenÄlem 52°E / MonacoSAT), into orbit.[115][116] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida No attempt
2015 May Test SpaceX launches a major test of a rocket escape system for its manned Dragon spaceships, a critical system designed to save astronauts in a launch emergency.[57][117]
2015 June 28 (14:21:11) Failed mission (ISS resupply) Mission N° F9-20.[118] A Falcon9 rocket explodes during takeoff.[43] The SpaceX CRS-7 launch vehicle disintegrates a few minutes after liftoff.[119] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida
2015 October Infrastructure SpaceX begins soil preparation at SpaceX South Texas Launch Site.[120]
2015 November 23 Competition Human-rated suborbital rocket New Shepard is successfuly launched by Blue Origin into space, landing back vertically. This makes it the first VTVL rocket to land on Earth from space.[121]
2015 November 25 Background (policy) United States President Barack Obama signs the Commercial Space Launch Competitiveness Act, which allows US citizens and industries to "engage in the commercial exploration and exploitation of space resources" including water and minerals.[122]
2015 December 22 (01:29:00) Milestone mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-21.[123] Falcon 9 flight 20 launches carrying 11 Orbcomm-OG2 communications satellites to Earth orbit. In this mission SpaceX achieves the first landing of an orbital rocket's first stage on land.[55][57][42][43][124][66] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (Landing Zone 1), Florida
2016 January 17 (18:42:18) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-19.[125] SpaceX launches the Jason-3 satellite for NASA, which plans to measure the height of the ocean surface, aboard a Falcon 9 rocket. The first stage lands at a good speed, but one of the legs wouldn't latch, causing it to fall over and subsequently explode.[124] Vandenberg Air Force Base (LC-4, California Failed landing at Just Read the Instructions (JRtI) autonomous spaceport drone ship
2016 January 22 Competition Blue Origin's VTVL rocket becomes the first VTVL to reach space twice, after launching and landing the same New Shepard booster flown in November.[126]
2016 March 4 (23:35:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-22.[127] SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches into orbit carrying the SES-9 communications satellite.[128] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Failed landing at Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2016 April 8 (20:43:31) Mission (ISS resupply) Mission N° F9-23.[129] SpaceX achieves the first landing of an orbital rocket's first stage on an ocean platform (Falcon 9 Flight 23).[55][57][42] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2016 May 6 (05:21:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-24.[130] Falcon 9 Full Thrust launches carrying Japanese satellite JCSAT-14 toward geostationary transfer orbit (GTO). The mission records another successful landing of a rocket stage at sea when the rocket booster returns to a drone ship off the Florida coast.[131] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2016 May 27 (21:39:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-25.[132] SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches placing the Thaicom 8 commercial telecommunications satellite into geostationary transfer orbit.[133] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2016 June 15 (14:29:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Falcon 9 flight 26 launches both ABS's ABS-2A and Eutelsat's Eutelsat 117 West B (formerly Satmex 9) to geostationary transfer orbit.[134][135] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2016 July 18 (04:45:29) Mission (ISS resupply) Mission N° F9-27.[136] SpaceX CRS-9 Commercial Resupply Service mission launches aboard Falcon 9 Full Thrust carrying a Dragon capsule toward the International Space Station for resupply.[137] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (Landing Zone 1), Florida
2016 August 14 (05:26:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-28.[138] SpaceX Falcon 9 successfully launches JCSAT-16 commercial telecommunications satellite into geostationary transfer orbit, before landing on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean.[139] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2016 September 1 (13:07) Failed mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-29, scheduled for launch on September 3, fails as the Falcon 9 explodes on the pad, just before a static-fire test.[140] Israeli Earth communications satellite Amos-6 is destroyed.[141] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida
2017 January 14 (17:54:39) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-30.[142] SpaceX Falcon 9 successfully delivers 10 Iridium NEXT satellites to low-Earth orbit for Iridium Communications, an American company that operates mobile voice and data satellite communications.[143] Vandenberg Air Force Base (LC-4, California Just Read the Instructions (JRtI) autonomous spaceport drone ship
2017 February 19 ( 14:39:00) Mission (ISS resupply) Mission N° F9-32.[144] SpaceX CRS-10 Dragon Commercial Resupply Service mission launches aboard Falcon 9 carrying nearly 5,500 pounds of supplies to the International Space Station.[145] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (Landing Zone 1), Florida
2017 March 16 (06:00:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-31.[146] SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket delivers heavyweight EchoStar 23 communications satellite into a high-altitude orbit, a mission near the limit of capability.[147] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida No attempt
2017 March 30 (22:27:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-33.[148] SpaceX reuses a rocket for the first time ever. The Falcon 9 launches from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida with the SES-10 communications satellite.[149][66][150][57] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2017 May 1 (11:15:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-34.[151] SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches classified satellite for the United States National Reconnaissance Office (NRO).[152] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (Landing Zone 1), Florida
2017 May 15 (23:21:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-35.[153] SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches from Kennedy Space Center Inmarsat 5 F4 communications satellite.[154] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida No attempt
2017 June 3 (21:07:38) Mission (ISS resupply) Mission N° F9-36.[155] SpaceX CRS-11 Commercial Resupply Service mission launches as the first reflight of a commercial cargo spacecraft, the SpaceX Dragon C106.[156][57] The refurbished ship flies to the International Space Station, carrying onboard NASA telescope Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer. It is the first time the same unmanned spacecraft returns to the station.[42][66] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (Landing Zone 1), Florida
2017 June 23 (19:10:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-37.[157] SpaceX Falcon 9 launches into orbit BulgariaSat-1, the first geostationary communications satellite in Bulgaria’s history.[158] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2017 June 25 (20:25:14) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-38.[159] Falcon 9 rocket launches and successfully deploys ten Iridium communications satellites.[160][161][162] Vandenberg Air Force Base (LC-4, California Just Read the Instructions (JRtI) autonomous spaceport drone ship
2017 July 5 (23:38:00) Mission (Communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-39.[163] Falcon 9 launches from Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39, carrying the Intelsat 35e satellite to geostationary transfer orbit.[164] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida No attempt
2017 August 14 (16:31:37) Mission (ISS resupply) Mission N° F9-41.[165] SpaceX Falcon 9 launches from Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39 carrying the Dragon vehicle in its twelfth flight (SpaceX CRS-12) to the International Space Station.[166] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (Landing Zone 1), Florida
2017 August 24 (18:51:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-40.[167] SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, carrying the Formosat-5 Earth observation satellite for Taiwan’s National Space Organization.[168] Vandenberg Air Force Base (LC-4, California Just Read the Instructions (JRtI) autonomous spaceport drone ship
2017 September Technology introduction New rocket booster, the BFR rocket is announced, along with updated plans for Mars colonization.[42]
2017 September 7 (14:00:00) Mission (spacecraft launch) Mission N° F9-42.[169] SpaceX’s Falcon 9 successfully launches the Boeing Orbital Test Vehicle 5 (OTV-5) payload from Launch Complex 39A (LC-39A) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.[170][171][172] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (Landing Zone 1), Florida
2017 September 29 Vehicle design update At the 68th annual meeting of the International Astronautical Congress, SpaceX unveils the updated vehicle design of a big Falcon rocket. Musk says, "we are searching for the right name, but the code name, at least, is BFR."[173]
2017 October 9 (12:37:01) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-44.[174] SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California with 10 next-generation Iridium communications satellites (Third flight).[175][176][177] Vandenberg Air Force Base (LC-4, California Just Read the Instructions (JRtI) autonomous spaceport drone ship
2017 October 11 (22:53:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-43.[178] SpaceX successfully launches the EchoStar 105/SES-11 payload from Launch Complex 39A (LC-39A) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The satellite is deployed approximately 36 minutes after liftoff into its targeted orbit.[179][180][181] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2017 October 30 (19:34:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-45.[182] SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches from Cape Canaveral and successfully delivers South Korean satellite Koreasat 5A to its designated orbit, marking the the company’s 16th successful mission of the year — twice the number of successful missions in 2016.[183][184][185][51] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2017 November Program launch SpaceX plans launch of the most powerful rocket since the Saturn V last left for the moon in 1973.[42]
2017 November Financial (funding) SpaceX raises US$452.3 million from a number of investors including ACE & Company, Ecosystem Ventures, and Matthew Pritzker Company, in Series H funding round, reaching a valuation of US$21.3 billion.[44]
2017 December 15 (15:36:09) Mission (ISS resupply) Mission N° F9-47.[186] SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches the 13th operational Dragon cargo spacecraft (SpaceX CRS-13) to the International Space Station on the company’s fourth mission under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program in the year.[187] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (Landing Zone 1), Florida
2017 December 23 (01:27:34) Mission (Communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-48.[188] SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California with 10 next-generation Iridium Communications satellites (fourth flight).[51] Vandenberg Air Force Base (LC-4, California Controlled landing on the ocean
2018 January 8 (01:00:00) Mission (Communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-46.[189] SpaceX launches classified spacecraft Zuma for the United States government.[190] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (Landing Zone 1), Florida
2018 January 21 Competition American aerospace company Rocket Lab officially becomes the second private company to make it into orbit on private funds, and the first private company to launch cargo into orbit from a private launch site, after successful launch of its Electron rocket from Mahia Launch Center, located on the north island of New Zealand on the Mahia Peninsula.[191] Rocket Lab Launch Complex 1
2018 January 31 (21:25:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-49.[192] Falcon 9 rocket launches Luxembourg’s first military spacecraft, the SES-16/GovSat 1 geostationary communications satellite, into a Geostationary Transfer Orbit (GTO). GovSat-1, also known as SES-16, is the first satellite to be launched for LuxGovSat, a partnership between the government of Luxembourg and commercial satellite operator SES S.A.[193] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Controlled landing on the ocean
2018 February 6 (20:45:00) Milestone mission Mission N° FH-01.[194] SpaceX successfully conducts a test launch of its Falcon Heavy rocket carrying aboard a Tesla Roadster and “Starman”, a dummy in a SpaceX spacesuit. The Roadster is destined into a billion-year orbit around Mars.[195] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida Failed B3 B1033 booster landing at Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship. Successful B2 B1023.2 and B2 B1025.2 booster landing at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (Landing Zones 1 and 2), Florida
2018 February 22 (14:17:00) Mission (Communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-50.[196] SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches Spain’s Paz radar satellite from Vandenberg Air Force Base. The launch also carries the first demonstration satellites for SpaceX’s own satellite internet constellation, the SpaceX Starlink.[197] Vandenberg Air Force Base (LC-4, California No attempt
2018 March 6 (05:33:00) Mission (Communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-51.[198] SpaceX launches its 50th Falcon 9 rocket, successfully orbiting a city bus-sized satellite for Spanish operator Hispasat.[199][200] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida No attempt
2018 March 15 Contract The United States Air Force announces a deal with SpaceX to fly three of the newest generation of Global Positioning System satellites into space, at an average cost of US$97 million per flight.[201][202][203]
2018 March 30 (14:13:51) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-52. Falcon 9 launches carrying 10 Iridium satellites and a satellite dispenser.[204] Vandenberg Air Force Base (LC-4, California No attempt
2018 April 2 (20:30:38) Mission (ISS resupply) Mission N° F9-53.[205] The SpaceX CRS-14 Commercial Resupply Service mission launches with a reused Falcon 9 Full Thrust.[206] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida No attempt
2018 April 18 (22:51:30) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-54.[207] SpaceX launches NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) into outer space in a mission aimed at surveying nearly the entire sky for exoplanets.[208][209][210][211] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2018 April 21 Financial (funding) SpaceX raises US$214 million from Fidelity Investments, Otter Rock Capital, The K Fund, 7percent Ventures, Hemisphere Ventures, TH Capital, ACE Capital, StraightPath Venture Partners, Aeon Family of Funds, and Team in Residence, in Series I funding round, reaching a valuation of US$24.7 billion.[44]
2018 May 11 (20:14:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-55.[212] SpaceX launches updated version of Falcon 9 rocket carrying Bangladeshi Bangabandhu-1 Satellite into geostationary orbit.[213][214][215][216] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2018 May 22 (19:47:58) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-56.[217] SpaceX launches Falcon 9 rocket carrying seven satellites intended to replace earlier spacecraft, including five Iridium NEXT telephone relay stations and a pair of Earth-observing satellites for NASA.[218][219][220][221] Vandenberg Air Force Base (LC-4, California No attempt
2018 June 4 (04:45:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-57. Falcon 9 launches carrying the geostationary communications satellite SES-12, operated by SES S.A.[222] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida No attempt
2018 June 29 (09:42:42) Mission (ISS resupply) Mission N° F9-58.[223] SpaceX reuses Dragon Cargo Ship and launches aboard a Falcon 9 Full Thrust[224] its 15th cargo mission (SpaceX CRS-15) to the International Space Station for NASA, sending up nearly 3 tons of supplies, including coffee, berries and ice cream, mice and the first orbiting robot with artificial intelligence.[225][226][227][228][229][230][231] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida No attempt
2018 July 22 (05:50:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-59.[232] SpaceX launches Falcon 9 rocket deploying the Telstar 19V communications satellite for Canada’s Telesat.[233][234][235][236] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2018 July 25 (11:39:26) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-60. Falcon 9 launches carrying 10 Iridium NEXT satellites, plus a satellite dispenser.[237] Vandenberg Air Force Base (LC-4, California Just Read the Instructions (JRtI) autonomous spaceport drone ship
2018 August 7 (05:18:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-61. Falcon 9 launches carrying Telkom 4 (Merah Putih) satellite to geostationary transfer orbit.[238] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2018 September 10 (04:45:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-62. Falcon 9 launches carrying into orbit the Telstar 18V communication satellite, from the Telstar series of the Canadian satellite communications company Telesat.[239] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2018 September 13 Contract SpaceX reports having signed its first customer to fly on the company’s new rocket, the Big Falcon Rocket (BFR).[240][241][242][243] Days later SpaceX reveals that the customer is Yusaku Maezawa, a Japanese billionaire and founder of Zozotown, Japan’s largest online clothing retailer.[244][245][246][247]
2018 October 8 (02:21:28) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-63.[248] Spacex Falcon 9 rocket launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base, successfully delivering Argentina's SAOCOM-1A Earth-observation satellite to orbit. The rocket lands for the first time back at its California launch site.[249][250][251][252] Vandenberg Air Force Base (LC-4, California Vandenberg Air Force Base (SpaceX Landing Zone 4), California
2018 November 15 Permission grant The U.S. Federal Communications Commission votes to let SpaceX launch more than 7,000 internet-beaming satellites, all planned to begin launch in 2019. SpaceX separately sought approval for 7,518 satellites operating even closer to the ground, saying that these would boost capacity and reduce latency in heavily populated areas.[253][254][255]
2018 November 15 (20:46:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-64.[256]SpaceX launches and lands another used Falcon 9 rocket, carrying Es'hail-2 communications satellite built by Mitsubishi and owned by the nation of Qatar.[257][258][259][260] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2018 December 3 (18:34:05) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-65. Falcon 9 launches carrying 64 small satellites.[261][262] Vandenberg Air Force Base (LC-4), California Just Read the Instructions (JRtI) autonomous spaceport drone ship
2018 December 5 (18:16:16) Mission (ISS resupply) Mission N° F9-66.[263] SpaceX CRS-16 Commercial Resupply Service mission is launched aboard a Falcon 9 Full Thrust, carrying to the International Space Station more than 2 tons of crew supplies, science investigations and equipment for NASA Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation mission.[264] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (Landing Zone 1), Florida
2018 December 23 (13:51:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-67.[265] Falcon 9 rocket launches from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida carrying the first advanced, next-generation "GPS III" satellite, built by Lockheed Martin.[266][267][268][269] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida No attempt
2019 January 11 Team SpaceX announces reduction of its workforce by about 10 percent of the company's more than 6,000 employees, explaining that the layoffs are in pursuit of becoming a “leaner company”, and citing "extraordinarily difficult challenges ahead."[270][271][272][273]
2019 January 11 (15:31:33) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-68.[274] SpaceX launches its first Falcon 9 rocket of the year, sending up 10 satellites for long-time customer Iridium Communications.[275][276][277][278] Vandenberg Air Force Base (LC-4, California Just Read the Instructions (JRtI) autonomous spaceport drone ship
2019 January Financial (funding) SpaceX raises US$273.2 million from a large number of investors including Founders Fund, 137 Ventures, and Scott Banister, in Series J funding round, reaching a valuation of US$28 billion.[44]
2019 February 22 (01:45:00) Mission (Communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-70.[279] SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches from Cape Canaveral, carrying an Indonesian communications satellite into orbit, and a small Israeli spacecraft attempting the first privately-funded, non-superpower moon landing in April.[280][281][282][283][284] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2019 March 2 (07:49:03) Mission (ISS technology demonstration) Mission N° F9-69.[285] Crew Dragon Demo-1 launches as the first orbital test of the Dragon 2 spacecraft, in an uncrewed mission.[286] On March 3, the Crew Dragon docks with the International Space Station, becoming the first American spacecraft to autonomously dock with the orbiting laboratory.[13] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2019 March 29 Elon Musk biography Elon Musk proposes an unusual approach to conducting a robotic survey of the Solar System’s major outer planets, asteroids, and comets, requiring a stripped-down Starship with a minimalist payload of Starlink satellites modified for interplanetary cruises and high-resolution cameras.[287]
2019 April 3 Test (Starship) A test version of SpaceX’s next-generation spacecraft, the Starship, successfully ignites its onboard engine for the first time.[288][289][290] SpaceX South Texas Launch Site, Texas
2019 April 5 Test (Starship) In a nighttime test, SpaceX Starship (Starhopper) lifts off and hits tether limits reaching the end of it. SpaceX performs the test with the tether serving as a safety line on the vehicle.[291][292] SpaceX South Texas Launch Site
2019 April 11 (22:35:00) Mission (Communications satellite delivery) Mission N° FH-02.[293] Falcon Heavy launches carrying into orbit the Arabsat-6A satellite, operated by the Arab Satellite Communications Organization.[294] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida B5 B1055 booster landing at Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship, B5 B1052.1 booster landing at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LZ-1), B5 B1053.1 booster landing at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LZ-2)
2019 April 12 Contract NASA announces a launch services contract with SpaceX for the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) space probe. The launch is scheduled for June 2021 on a Falcon 9 rocket. The total cost to launch DART is about US$69 million.[295][296][297] Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
2019 April 20 Failed test A SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule explodes during tests being carried out on the ground.[298] Kennedy Space Center, Florida
2019 April 30 Contract The United States Federal Communications Commission grants a request by SpaceX to begin launching spacecraft for the company’s Starlink broadband network to a lower orbit than originally planned. The regulatory commission approves SpaceX’s proposal to fly more than 1,500 of the Starlink satellites at an altitude of 550 kilometers, instead of the 1,150-kilometer orbit originally planned.[299][300]
2019 May 4 (06:48:58) Mission (ISS resupply) Mission N° F9-71.[301] SpaceX CRS-17 Commercial Resupply Service mission launches aboard a Falcon 9 toward the International Space Station for resupply, carrying NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory 3.[302] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Ocean (Autonomous spaceport drone ship)
2019 May 9 Competition Jeff Bezos unveils Blue Origin's vision for space and also plans for a moon lander known as "Blue Moon".[303]
2019 May 24 Financial (funding) SpaceX raises US$500 million from Baillie Gifford, FoundersX Ventures, and Gigafund in Series K funding round, reaching a valuation of US$32.3 billion.[44]
2019 May 24 (02:30:00) Mission (Communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-72.[304] SpaceX launches a batch of 60 internet communications satellites from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.[305][306][307] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Ocean (Autonomous spaceport drone ship)
2019 May 31 Financial (valuation) SpaceX valuation rises to US$33.3 billion, surpassing in worth to Tesla, Inc.[308][309]
2019 May Elon Musk biography Elon Musk floats the idea of using single-stage Starship to travel up to 10,000 kilometers on Earth-to-Earth flights at speeds approaching Mach 20 (25,000 km/h) with an acceptable payload saying it "dramatically improves cost, complexity & ease of operations."[310]
2019 June 12 (14:17:00) Mission (Communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-73.[311] Falcon 9 launches carrying the RADARSAT Constellation, a three-spacecraft fleet of Earth observation satellites operated by the Canadian Space Agency.[312][313] Vandenberg Air Force Base (LC-4, California Vandenberg Air Force Base (SpaceX Landing Zone 4), California
2019 June 25 (06:30:00) Mission (Communications satellite delivery) Mission N° FH-03.[314] NASA's Green Propellant Infusion Mission launches aboard Falcon Heavy carrying 24 satellites for the United States Department of Defense (Space Test Program) and other customers. Elon Musk calls this mission SpaceX’s “most difficult launch ever.”[315][316][317] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (Landing Zones 1 and 2), Florida
2019 June 27 Financial (funding) SpaceX raises US$314 million from a number of investors including Vanedge Capital and Space Angels, in Series L funding round, reaching a valuation of US$34.1 billion.[44]
2019 July 25 (22:01:56) Mission (ISS resupply) Mission N° F9-74.[318] SpaceX CRS-18 ressupply mission launches toward the International Space Station, for the first time reusing a Dragon Capsule for a third flight.[319] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (Landing Zone 1), Florida
2019 July 25 Test (Starship) SpaceX Starship (Starhopper) launches for the first time. The rocket makes its first free-flying test launch at SpaceX's Boca Chica proving ground in South Texas.[320][321][322] SpaceX South Texas Launch Site, Texas
2019 August 6 (23:23:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-75.[323] SpaceX Falcon 9 launches carrying Israeli commercial communication satellite AMOS-17.[324] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida No attempt
2019 August 27 (22:00:00) Test (Starship) SpaceX Starhopper, the first prototype for its Mars-colonizing Starship vehicle, is put to final test flight, rising several hundred feet off the ground at the SpaceX South Texas Launch Site in Boca Chica Village, Texas. Starhopper reaches a hover altitude and then flies sideways to touch town at a separate nearby landing pad. The entire flight lasts just 57 seconds.[325] SpaceX South Texas Launch Site SpaceX South Texas Launch Site nearby landing pad
2019 October 3 Financial (funding) SpaceX receives a US$3 million grant from NASA.[44]
2019 November 11 (14:56:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-76.[326] Falcon 9 launches carrying a payload of 60 Starlink satellites.[327] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2019 December 5 (17:29:24) Mission (ISS resupply) Mission N° F9-77.[328] SpaceX CRS-19 Commercial Resupply Service mission reuses Dragon C106 (first launched on September 21, 2014) aboard Falcon 9, delivering cargo toward the International Space Station for resupply.[329] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2019 December 17 (00:10:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-78.[330] Falcon 9 launches carrying heavyweight JCSAT-18 and Kacific1 satellites into orbit.[331] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2020 January 7 (02:19:21) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-79.[332] Falcon 9 launches carrying sixty more satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink global internet network.[333] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2020 January 19 (15:30:00) Mission (launch) Mission N° F9-80.[334] SpaceX simulates an in-flight emergency to verify the company’s Crew Dragon spacecraft has the capability to catapult itself away from a failing Falcon 9 rocket.[335] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida No attempt
2020 January 29 (14:06:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-81.[336] Falcon 9 launches carrying fourth batch of Starlink satellites, deployed in a circular 290km orbit. A total of 60 satellites are delivered.[337][338][339] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2020 February 4 Contract SpaceX is selected by NASA to provide launch services for the agency’s Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission.[340]
2020 February 17 (15:05:55) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-82.[341] Falcon 9 launches carrying to orbit a total of 60 Starlink satellites for new megaconstellation. The mission misses rocket landing.[342][343] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Failed landing at Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2020 February 28 Contract SpaceX is awarded launch contract for NASA’s 2022 mission to explore the mineral-rich asteroid 16 Psyche. The contract includes launch services and other mission-related costs valued at US$117 million, an amount remarkably low for a mission of this scale.[344]
2020 February 28 Failed test (Starship) SpaceX Starship SN1 prototype explodes during pressure test.[345][346]
2020 March 7 (04:50:31) Mission (ISS resupply) Mission N° F9-83.[347] SpaceX conducts last launch of phase 1 of the CRS contract (SpaceX CRS-20), carrying Bartolomeo, an ESA platform for hosting external payloads onto International Space Station.[348][349][350] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (Landing Zone 1), Florida
2020 March Financial (funding) SpaceX receives US$221.2 million in funding in a Series M funding round, reaching a valuation of US$36.1 billion.[44]
2020 March 18 (12:16:39) Mission (communications satellite delivery) SpaceX launches 60 Starlink satellites into orbit. Towards the end for the first stage burn, the booster suffers premature shut down of an engine, the first of a Merlin 1D variant and first since the CRS-1 mission in October 2012. However, the payload still manages to reach the targeted orbit.[351] The mission misses rocket landing, considered to be the second Starlink launch booster landing failure in a row. It is later revealed that the cause was a residual cleaning fluid trapped inside a sensor.[352] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2020 April 22 (19:30:00) Milestone mark achievement Mission N° F9-85.[353] Falcon 9 launches carrying 60 Starlink satellites. The SpaceX’s Starlink network surpasses 400-satellite mark after successful launch.[354] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2020 April 26 Test (Starship) SpaceX Starship SN4 becomes the first full-scale prototype to pass and survive a cryogenic proof test, in which the ship’s normal liquid oxygen and methane is replaced with similarly frigid but non-explosive liquid nitrogen.[355]
2020 April 30 Competition Blue Origin's Blue Moon Lander is selected by NASA as a winner of the Human Lander Systems award under the Next Space Technologies for Exploration Partnerships (NextSTEP-2), besting competitive companies, SpaceX and Dynetics.[356][357]
2020 May 1 Contract SpaceX is selected by NASA to develop a lunar optimized starship to transport crew between lunar orbit and the surface of the Moon as part of NASA’s Artemis program.[358][359][360]
2020 May Notable comment Elon Musk says: “SpaceX has been working this entire time because we have a national security exemption. We’ve had 8,000 people working full time through the whole pandemic. We’ve had zero serious illnesses or deaths despite working in L.A., Washington, Texas and Florida.”[61][361]
2020 May 23 Notable comment Elon Musk tweets: "We need to accelerate progress towards fully reusable rockets. Cost per ton to orbit needs to improve by >1000% from where Falcon is today for there to be a self-sustaining city on Mars", implying it is presently too costly for self-sustaining metropolis on Mars.[362]
2020 May 30 (19:22:00) Milestone mission (ISS crew transport) Mission N° F9-87.[363] Crew Dragon Demo-2 launches as a crewed flight test, transporting astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken toward the International Space Station.[364] This mission marks the beginning of a SpaceX human spaceflight era[365], and the first American crewed mission in years since the conclusion of the Space Shuttle Program.[366] Kennedy Space Center (LC-39), Florida Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship
2020 June 4 (01:25:00) Mission (communications satellite delivery) Mission N° F9-86[367] (Starlink-7 mission). Falcon 9 launches carrying a batch of 60 Starlink broadband satellites, including one with a deployable sunshield meant to test out a new way to reduce the brightness of future satellites.[368][369][370] Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (LC-40), Florida Just Read the Instructions (JRtI) autonomous spaceport drone ship

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See also

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References

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