Timeline of immigrant processing and visa policy in Canada

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This page provides a timeline of key events related to immigrant processing and visa policy of Canada. This page provides a timeline of key events related to immigrant processing and visa policy of Canada. It focuses on laws, policies, and programs affecting pathways for authorized entry to Canada and long-term immigrant and non-immigrant statuses. It is complementary to the timeline of immigration enforcement in Canada.

The timeline is still under construction. We aim for it to have comparable coverage to timeline of immigrant processing and visa policy in the United States. In the meantime, check out references 1 and 2.[1][2]

Full timeline

Year Month and date (if available) Event type Affected agencies (past, and present equivalents) Details
1869 Legislation Department of Agriculture The Immigration Act, 1869 is passed. The Act allows largely free migration, and is made as such to encourage settlement of the Western provinces (as opposed to using Canada as a transit stop on the way to the United States). It includes provisions regulating the conditions of travel on ships arriving in Canada. Immigration is now under the Department of Agriculture[3][4][2][1]
1885 July 20 Legislation The Chinese Immigration Act of 1885 becomes law. The Act places a head tax of $50 (current Canadian dollars) on all Chinese immigrants coming to Canada, and restricts ships entering Canada to carrying only one Chinese immigrant per 50 tonnes of the ship's weight. The Act comes shortly after the passage of the United States' Immigration Act of 1882 (that places a much smaller head tax on all immigrants coming to the United States) and the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 (that forbids Chinese skilled and unskilled laborers from migrating to the United States).
1887 Legislation The Chinese Immigration Act of 1885 is amended to allow Chinese women married to non-Chinese men to enter Canada, as well as Chinese passing through Canada via railway.[1]
1892 Legislation The Chinese Immigration Act of 1885 is amended to require Chinese residents of Canada to register before leaving the country.[1]
1900 Legislation The head tax for Chinese immigrants to Canada (imposed in the Chinese Immigration Act of 1885) is raised from $50 to $100.[1]
1903 Legislation The head tax for Chinese immigrants to Canada (imposed in the Chinese Immigration Act of 1885) is raised from $100 to $500.[1][2]
1904-1905 The Royal Commission on Italian Immigration investigates the exploitation of Italian labourers by employment brokers known as padroni.[1]
1906 Legislation The Immigration Act of 1906 is passed. The Act is developed under the guidance of Frank Oliver, minister of the interior from 1905 to 1911, and a critic of unrestricted European immigration. The Act significantly expands the class of "undesirable" immigrants from the orginal specifications in 1869. It also formalizes the deportation process for people who would be denied entry, allowing for any person who wuld be denied entry to be deportable within two years of entering Canada. The Act also establishes boards of inquiry at each port to decide cases of immigrants seeking entry.[5][6][7][8][1][2]
1908 Agreement Gentlemen's Agreement, 1908.[1] This is after negotiations began in 1907.[2]
1908 Legislation The government of Canada passes the continuous journey regulation, an amendment to the Immigration Act of 1906 that forbids the entry of people who did not come from their country of birth or citizenship via a continuous journey. This is an attempt to indirectly block immigration from India and, to a lesser extent, Japan.[9][1][2]
1910 Legislation The Immigration Act of 1910 is passed. The Act reinforces and expands upon the provisions of the Immigration Act of 1906.[10][11][12][8]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 Van Dyk, Lindsay. "Canadian Immigration Acts and Legislation". Canada Museum of Immigration at Pier21. Retrieved November 24, 2017. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 "Historical Timeline: Changes to Canada's Immigration Policies" (PDF). Retrieved November 24, 2017. 
  3. "Immigration Act, 1869". Canada Museum of Immigration at Pier21. Retrieved November 24, 2017. 
  4. "IMMIGRATION ACT (CANADA) (1869)". Immigration to North America. Retrieved November 24, 2017. 
  5. "Immigration Act, 1906". Canada Museum of Immigration at Pier21. Retrieved November 24, 2017. 
  6. "IMMIGRATION ACT (CANADA) (1906)". Immigration to North America. Retrieved November 20, 2017. 
  7. Hollihan, K. Tony (1992). ""A brake upon the wheel": Frank Oliver and the Creation of the Immigration Act of 1906". Past Imperfect. 1: 93–112. Retrieved November 24, 2017. 
  8. 8.0 8.1 "Canada's Immigration Policy, 1896-1910". The Canadian Journal of Economics and Political Science. 26 (4). November 1, 1960. Retrieved November 24, 2017. 
  9. "Continuous Journey Regulation, 1908". Canada Museum of Immigration at Pier21. Retrieved November 24, 2017. 
  10. "Immigration Act, 1910". Canada Museum of Immigration at Pier21. Retrieved November 24, 2017. 
  11. "3.1 Immigration Act 1910". March 6, 2015. Retrieved November 24, 2017. 
  12. . Eugenics Archive http://eugenicsarchive.ca/discover/timeline/5495c2414dcf0b0000000001. Retrieved November 24, 2017.  Missing or empty |title= (help)