Timeline of nuclear medicine

From Timelines
Jump to: navigation, search

This is a timeline of nuclear medicine.

Big picture

Time period Development summary
20th century The origin of nuclear medicine starts with the invention of the cyclotron by Ernest Lawrence.[1]
1950s By the 1950s, the clinical use of nuclear medicine becomes widespread as researchers increase their understanding of detecting radioactivity and using radionuclides to monitor biochemical processes.[2]

Full timeline

Year Event type Details Location
1896 Henri Becquerel discovers that uranium emits penetrating rays similar to X-rays.[3]
1911 "The possibility to produce artificial radionuclides was something the chemist George de Hevesy had long waited for. In 1911. when working under Rutherford at the Cavendish Laboratory, he developed the idea that a ra- dioactive substance, chemically unseparable from a stable substance, could be used as an indicator of the latter"[4]
1927 Blumgart and Weiss use Bi214 to measure circulation time from one arm to the other in both normal and abnormal patients. This is the first time a radionuclide is employed in diagnostic medicine.[4]
1928 American scientist Ernest Lawrence starts working at University of California in Berkeley as a nuclear physicist.[1] United States
1928 Organization The International Commission on Radiological Protection is formed.
1930 "In 1930, Ernest Lawrence built the first cyclotron which was only 4 inches in diameter. It involved 2 D-shaped magnets, which created a circular magnetic field, with a small gap between them. The alternating electric field accelerated the particles and causing the radius of the circular path to increase until it hit the target. "[1] "However, in 1930 E. Lawrence at the University of California in Berkeley, developed the first cyclotron "[4] United States
1932 "The neutron was discovered by J. Chadwick in 1932 "[4]
1933 "However, in 1930 E. Lawrence at the University of California in Berkeley, developed the first cyclotron and at thc end of 1933 he had built a machine capable of yielding a beam of 3 MeV deutrons and with an intensity equiva- lent to enormous quantities of radium in a Ra-Be source"[4]
1934 Artificial radioactivity is first discovered.[2] "1934 F. Joliot and I. Curie were able to prove the production of an artificial radionuclide"[4]
1935 John Lawrence (Ernest Lawrence's brother), in his experiments on neutrons finds that they are far more dangerous than X-rays, resulting in the first safety measures being drawn up for the medical use of radioactive materials.[5]
1936 Hamilton and Stone in California, employ the first artificially produced radioisotope for therapeutic trials.[4] United States
1942 "On December 2, 1942, E. Fermi and co-workers achieved the first self-sustained nuclear chain reaction and the construc- tion of the nuclear reactor began"[4]
1946 Radionuclides are first produced for medical use at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.[2] United States
1946 "Nuclear medicine first became recognised as a potential medical speciality in 1946 when it was described by Sam Seidlin in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Seidlin reported on the success of radioactive iodine (I-131) in treating a patient with advanced thyroid cancer."[2] "Radionuclides for medical and biological research wcre now available for general use and the first commercial announcement was published in the June 14, 1946 issue of the journal Science"[4]
1947 "Of special importance for the start of nuclear medicine in the Nordic countries was the production of radionuclides at Harwell in the UK, which began at the end of 1947"[4] United Kingdom
1950 Diagnostic nuclear medicine begins in Sweden with the thyroid in all the university hospitals with Bengt Skanse as the pioneer.[4] Sweden
1951 "Five shipments to UK hospitals were made that year, this amount increasing to 2 800 in 1951, including shipments to hospitals in the Nordic countries "[4]
1951 Organization The Japan Radioisotope Association is formed. Japan
1952 "In 1952. H.O. Anger at Donner Laboratory in the USA constructed a pin-hole camera for gamma-rays. With this instrument. an image of the radionuclide distribution "[4]
1954 Organization The Society of Nuclear Medicine is formed in Spokane, Washington.[2] United States
1957 Anger constructs the prototype of the modern gamma camera, a breakthrough for the stationary detector.[4]
1957 The National Institute of Radiological Sciences is established in Japan. Japan
1959 Specialized textbook Diagnostic radioisotopes is published. It contains 528 references concerning iodine metabolism, thyroid function and diagnostic tests.[4]
1960 The Society of Nuclear Medicine launches its first publication of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, which becomes the flagship journal associated with the field. United States
1964 Organization The Swiss Society for Radiation Biology is founded in Geneva.[6] Switzerland
1964 Literature The Journal of Nuclear Medicine is first issued.
1966 Organization The British Nuclear Medicine Society is founded.[7] United Kingdom
1967 Organization The Society of Nuclear Medicine, India (SNM-India) is founded with the aim to promote, encourage and help the development and advancement of Nuclear Medicine as a specialty in the country.[8] India
1968 Literature (book) Principles of Nuclear Medicine, by Henry N. Wagner, is published.[9]
1970 The World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (WFNMB) is founded at the third ALASBIMN Congress in Mexico City.[10] Mexico
1971 The American Medical Association acknowledges nuclear medicine as an official medical specialty.[2] United States
1972 Organization The American Board of Nuclear Medicine is formed.[2] United States
1973 Literature The Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology is established.
1974 Organization The American Osteopathic Board of Nuclear Medicine is established. United States
1974 Literature Peer-reviewed medical journal Nuclear Medicine and Biology is first issued.
1974 The First World Congress of Nuclear Medicine is held in Tokyo and Kyoto, Japan.[10] Japan
1976 Organization The American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine is founded. United States
1976 The European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging is first issued.
1978 The World Congress of Nuclear Medicine is held in Washington, D.C.. The congress is attended by approximately 1700 people.[10] United States
1979 Literature (book) Fundamentals of Nuclear Pharmacy, by Gopal B. Saha is published.[11]
1980 Organization The Chinese Nuclear Society is founded. China
1980 Literature (book) James A. Sorenson publishes Physics in Nuclear Medicine.[12]
1982 The World Congress of Nuclear Medicine is held in Paris.[10] France
1983 Literature (book) Fred A. Mettler, Milton J. Guiberteau publish Essentials of Nuclear Medicine Imaging.[13]
1984 Literature (journal) Peer-reviewed medical journal Magnetic Resonance in Medicine is first issued.
1985 The European Association of Nuclear Medicine is formed.
1985 Literature (book) Pediatric Nuclear Medicine, by S.T. Treves is published.[14]
1986 The World Congress of Nuclear Medicine is held in Buenos Aires.[10] Argentina
1988 Literature (book) Ignac Fogelman publishes An Atlas of Clinical Nuclear Medicine.[15]
1989 Literature (book) Practical Nuclear Medicine, by Peter F. Sharp, is published.[16]
1990 The World Congress of Nuclear Medicine is held in Montreal.[10] Canada
1993 Organization The Society of Nuclear Medicine, Bangladesh is formed.[17] Bangladesh
1993 Literature (book) Physics and radiobiology of nuclear medicine, by Gopal B. Saha, is published.[18]
1993 Organization The American Society of Nuclear Cardiology is formed.[19] United States
1994 The World Congress of Nuclear Medicine is held in Sydney.[10] Australia
1994 Literature The Journal of Nuclear Cardiology is first issued.
1995 Literature (book) Harvey A. Ziessman, James H Thrall, and Janis P. O'Malley publish Nuclear Medicine: The Requisites.
1996 Organization The Brazilian Society on Nuclear Biosciences is founded.[20] Brazil
1998 Literature (book) Ramesh Chandra publishes Nuclear medicine physics.[21]
1998 The World Congress of Nuclear Medicine is held in Berlin.[10] Germany
2000 Literature (book) Nuclear Medicine Technology: Procedures and Quick Reference by Pete Shackett is published.[22]
2000 Literature (book) Diagnostic Nuclear Medicine, by Christiaan Schiepers, is published.[23]
2002 Literature (book) Nuclear Medicine Technology: Review Questions for the Board Examinations, by Abass Alavi and Karen Ramer, is published.[24]
2002 The World Congress of Nuclear Medicine is held in Santiago.[10] Chile
2002 Literature (book) Therapeutic Applications of Monte Carlo Calculations in Nuclear Medicine, by H. Zaidi and G Sgouros, is published.[25]
2004 Literature (book) Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT: Technology and Techniques by Kristen M. Waterstram-Rich and Paul Christian is published.[26]
2006 The World Congress of Nuclear Medicine is held in Seoul.[10] South Korea
2007 Literature (book) Clinical Nuclear Medicine, by Hans-Jürgen Biersack and Leonard M. Freeman, is published.[27]
2008 The World Congress of Nuclear Medicine is held in Capetown.[10] South Africa
2010 Literature (book) Nuclear Medicine Instrumentation, by Jennifer Prekeges, is published.[28]
2012 Literature (book) Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, by Rahul Velez, is published.[29]
2014 The World Congress of Nuclear Medicine is held in Cancun.[10] Mexico
2014 Literature (book) Therapeutic Nuclear Medicine is published.[30]
2015 Literature (book) Chirayu Shah and Marques Bradshaw publish Nuclear Medicine: A Core Review.[31]
2015 Literature (book) Diagnostic Imaging: Nuclear Medicine, by Paige Bennett and Umesh D. Oza, is published.[32]
2016 Literature (book) Quality in Nuclear Medicine, by Andor W.J.M. Glaudemans, Jitze Medema, Annie K. van Zanten, and Rudi A.J.O. Dierckx, is published.[33]
2018 The World Congress of Nuclear Medicine is held in Melbourne.[10] Australia

Meta information on the timeline

How the timeline was built

The initial version of the timeline was written by User:Sebastian.

Funding information for this timeline is available.

Feedback and comments

Feedback for the timeline can be provided at the following places:

  • FIXME

What the timeline is still missing

Timeline update strategy

See also

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 "The History of Nuclear Medicine". bris.ac.uk. Retrieved 15 November 2018. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 "History of Nuclear Medicine". news-medical.net. Retrieved 15 November 2018. 
  3. Rootwelt, K. "Henri Beckquerel's discovery of radioactivity, and history of nuclear medicine. 100 years in the shadow or on the shoulder of Röntgen". PMID 9019879. 
  4. 4.00 4.01 4.02 4.03 4.04 4.05 4.06 4.07 4.08 4.09 4.10 4.11 4.12 4.13 4.14 "A Glance At The History Of Nuclear Medicine". tandfonline.com. Retrieved 16 November 2018. 
  5. "History of Nuclear Medicine". study.com. Retrieved 16 November 2018. 
  6. "Swiss Society for Radiation Biology". ssrpm.ch. Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  7. "A History of Radionuclide Studies in the UK: 50th Anniversary of the British Nuclear Medicine Society". researchgate.net. Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  8. "Society of Nuclear Medicine, India". snmicon2018.com. Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  9. "Principles of Nuclear Medicine". Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  10. 10.00 10.01 10.02 10.03 10.04 10.05 10.06 10.07 10.08 10.09 10.10 10.11 10.12 "World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology". wfnmb.org. Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  11. "Fundamentals of nuclear pharmacy". Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  12. "Physics in Nuclear Medicine". Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  13. Mettler, Fred A.; Guiberteau, Milton J. Essentials of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. 
  14. "Pediatric Nuclear Medicine". Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  15. "An Atlas of Clinical Nuclear Medicine". Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  16. "Practical Nuclear Medicine". Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  17. "Society of Nuclear Medicine, Bangladesh". snm-bd.org/. Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  18. "Physics and radiobiology of nuclear medicine". Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  19. "Nuclear Medicine: The Requisites". Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  20. "Brazilian Society on Nuclear Biosciences". sbbn.org.br. Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  21. "Nuclear medicine physics". Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  22. "Nuclear Medicine Technology: Procedures and Quick Reference". Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  23. "Diagnostic Nuclear Medicine". Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  24. "Nuclear Medicine Technology: Review Questions for the Board Examinations". Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  25. "Therapeutic Applications of Monte Carlo Calculations in Nuclear Medicine". Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  26. "Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT: Technology and Techniques". Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  27. "Clinical Nuclear Medicine". Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  28. "Nuclear Medicine Instrumentation". Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  29. "Nuclear Medicine and Radiology". Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  30. "Therapeutic Nuclear Medicine". Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  31. "Nuclear Medicine: A Core Review". Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  32. "Diagnostic Imaging: Nuclear Medicine". Retrieved 17 November 2018. 
  33. "Quality in Nuclear Medicine". Retrieved 17 November 2018.